Fareham volunteer hails new operation that could help blind people to see

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QA Hospital in Cosham

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A HISTORIC stem cell operation that could help people blind people see has been hailed as a huge development by a Fareham support group volunteer.

Surgeons in London have carried out a pioneering human embryonic stem cell operation in an ongoing trial to find a cure for age-related macular degeneration.

It’s a painless eye condition that causes a person to lose central vision, usually in both eyes, over time.

There are two types, know as wet and dry, and so far there is no cure.

Now a 60-year-old woman has undergone surgery and surgeons will find out in early December if the procedure has worked.

David Kett, who runs the Fareham Macular Support Group and volunteer for the charity Macular Society, has welcomed the news.

He said: ‘It’s a huge development and for the first time gives hope, and only the hope, that people living with wet or dry macular degeneration.

‘It’s the most common condition that will develop in to blindness in the country, and we will be keen to see the outcome of this trial.’

To find out more about support groups in the area, call 0300 3030 111 or visit macularsociety.org