Government could give extra funds into brain tumour research

Campaigner Simon Tier during a 400-mile cycle challenge for Brain Tumour Research
Campaigner Simon Tier during a 400-mile cycle challenge for Brain Tumour Research

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A MAN who lost his friend to a brain tumour has welcomed the government taking its first step to spending more money on research into the illness.

Simon Tier, from Fareham, has been raising money for Brain Tumour Research since his friend Alan Neilson was diagnosed with a tumour in 2011.

I am very encouraged by what was said in parliament.

Simon Tier

Mr Neilson lost his battle with the illness in November last year.

Simon has been raising awareness and money for the charity and campaigning for the government to allocate more money into research into treatment.

Last month, it was acknowledged by health minister George Freeman after a debate in parliament that more needs to be done.

It comes as 120,000 people signed a petition for more money to be spent on brain tumour research.

Simon, 48, said: ‘This is a significant first step.

‘It is great that for the first time at a national level our collective voice has been heard.

‘I’m very encouraged by what was said in parliament.’

The University of Portsmouth is home to a laboratory run by Brain Tumour Research.

Portsmouth South MP Flick Drummond has visited the site and spoke in the parliamentary debate.

Fareham MP Suella Fernandes also spoke.

She said: ‘I speak on behalf of people in Fareham who have been affected by this devastating and indiscriminate disease, for example, Simon Tier, whose best friend died because of a brain tumour and who is an indefatigable campaigner.

‘Does the health minister agree that current rates of funding are insufficient and that we need between £30m and £35m per year, in line with funding for research for other cancers?’

In his reply, Mr Freeman said: ‘We formally accept that more needs to be done. The case has been made that we need to look carefully at what we can do.’