Healthy mouth could increase your lifespan

SOUND ADVICE Richard Guyver, with his book Live Another 4006 days And Improve Your Health With Dental Medicine. Picture: Allan Hutchings (131650-048)
SOUND ADVICE Richard Guyver, with his book Live Another 4006 days And Improve Your Health With Dental Medicine. Picture: Allan Hutchings (131650-048)
Stuart Burnham with 12-year-old Andrew Impey and his mum, Kirstine Burnham   Picture: Habibur Rahman

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YOU could live for up to 11 years longer – just by keeping your mouth healthy and clean.

Dentist Richard Guyver, who lives in Hayling Island, has written a book which explains how he believes good oral practice can lead to a longer life.

It’s called Live Another 4,006 Days And Improve Your Health With Dental Medicine. Mr Guyver says his book is written for the public rather than dentists.

He said: ‘There is so much scientific research that exists, but it’s not in the public domain.

‘One of the first things I want to do is raise awareness of good oral hygiene.

‘I’ve cut out a lot of the medical jargon and terminology, so that people can hopefully understand things better.

‘It’s trying to make people understand that doing something like flossing your teeth helps.

‘It seems time-consuming, but the benefit it could give to your lifespan is without a doubt, worth taking that extra time each day.’

His book explains how the figure 4,006 is reached.

It provides a table of diseases, and the average reduction in life span because of each condition. These include diabetes, smoking cancer, high blood pressure and respiratory problems.

The average is then taken of this, and gives the number 4,006.

The book also explains how different diets and lifestyle choices, such as smoking and drinking, impacts the mouth.

Mr Guyver, who runs Envisage dental practice, in High Street, Emsworth, says inflammation in the mouth can often be a sign of bigger health problems.

In particular, Mr Guyver has been looking at the links between an unhealthy mouth and the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Research shows inflammation in the mouth can increase your risk of heart attacks, having a stroke and certain lung conditions.

‘It’s not been proven yet, but there’s a thought that inflammation in the mouth gives a boost to the immune system,’ he said.

‘If this inflammation goes on for a longer time, then it can end up damaging the organs.

‘There is so much research looking into this.’

To buy a copy of his book, go to amazon.co.uk or visit website 4006days.com.