Izzy aims to give children a happy Easter

Izzy 5 and Ethan Herridge 8 of Paulsgrove who have collected easter eggs to give to Southampton General Hospital's childrens ward''''Picture: Paul Jacobs (150478-1)

Izzy 5 and Ethan Herridge 8 of Paulsgrove who have collected easter eggs to give to Southampton General Hospital's childrens ward''''Picture: Paul Jacobs (150478-1)

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HAVING fought off cancer at only the age of five, young Izzy Herridge knows what it’s like to be in hospital.

Izzy was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when she was two.

The tot is now in remission after having chemotherapy and was treated at both Queen Alexandra Hospital, in Cosham, and Southampton General Hospital.

And to show their gratitude, her family, along with the church they attend and work colleagues, collected gifts to donate to children’s wards at both hospitals.

Mum-of-three Evanna, 32, of Deerhurst Crescent, in Paulsgrove, said: ‘Izzy seemed to have very heavy flu, so we took her to the doctors.

‘Our GP sent us on to QA and she had tests overnight and in the morning we were told she had a childhood cancer.

‘We were very scared and nervous, but Izzy was very brave and took it all in her stride.’

The family decided to collect Easter eggs for the children’s wards as a way to say thank you.

Evanna added: ‘We are part of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and members helped us out by donating eggs.

‘My husband Wayne works for Zurich in Whiteley and staff there also donated.

‘Since then each year we have collected gifts at Christmas and Easter to donate to the wards.’

This year the family has collected 85 chocolate eggs, which will all be donated to Southampton. This is because QA, which is run by Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, has requested people do not donate food.

A spokesman said: ‘In the last couple of years, we have asked donors to consider giving alternative gifts such as Easter craft kits because a number of children, for a variety of medical reasons, are unable to eat chocolate on the ward.

‘It’s very difficult to explain to one child why they can’t receive the gift, while the patient in the next bed can. If people want to support the children we care for on our paediatrics ward, we would be delighted if they consider giving non-edible gifts.’

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