Legendary rugby star takes a look around Naomi House

Former All Black Jonah Lomu and Adam Neil, two, pictured at Naomi House in September
Former All Black Jonah Lomu and Adam Neil, two, pictured at Naomi House in September
Alex Wardle, from Lee-on-the-Solent, collapsed at home and tragically died in March 2016, aged 23. 

From left: Alex's father, Stephen Wardle, sister Gemma Wardle, Alex Wardle and his mother, Denise Wardle.

Gosport family to keep Alex’s legacy alive by taking part in Great South Run

0
Have your say

HE MAY have 63 caps as an All Black and be regarded as one of the greatest rugby players of all time, but Jonah Lomu met his match when he came up against the Naomi House nursing team.

The 6ft 5in legendary ex-New Zealand winger toured the newly-refurbished hospice and met children, families and staff.

And he announced money raised from the south coast leg of his UK tour will support the children’s hospice, which supports children with life-threatening conditions and their families, including those from the Portsmouth area.

Taking time to see where the money will go, Jonah visited the hospice’s hydrotherapy pool, bedrooms, gardens and bereavement suite.

He said: ‘I thought it was an amazing place and a charity with a really nice feel to it. It was an absolute pleasure to meet the children and families and staff who make use of the facilities.

‘As a father myself and with the odd health complication of my own I fully understand how important a place like Naomi House and Jacksplace is for the community.’

Nephrotic syndrome, a kidney disorder, meant Jonah needed a transplant in 2004.

Hospice marketing manager Keith Wilson said: ‘Jonah spent time with absolutely everybody and really understood the importance of the work we do here.’