Parents back bid for better health help in Hampshire schools

SUPPORT Eight-year-old Megan Horn, who has Type 1 diabetes, with her parents Martin and Helen Horn, and four-year-old sister Chloe. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (14615-6)
SUPPORT Eight-year-old Megan Horn, who has Type 1 diabetes, with her parents Martin and Helen Horn, and four-year-old sister Chloe. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (14615-6)

NHS organisations give advice on where to get treatment this winter

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PARENTS across Hampshire are backing a national campaign for primary schools to be more aware of long-term medical conditions.

Megan Horn, eight, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes three years ago.

It means Megan’s body does not produce enough insulin to break down glucose, which provides energy.

If she does not monitor her blood sugar levels or have insulin injections, then she could fall into a potentially life-threatening diabetic coma.

Her parents Helen, and Martin Horn, of Mayles Lane, Knowle, monitor her levels at home, but need help from Megan’s school during the day.

Megan goes to Curdridge Primary School, in Church Lane, Curdridge.

Mrs Horn, 48, who owns a catering company, said: ‘It’s a continuous juggling act to make sure her levels are right.

‘This is why schools need to be aware of Type 1 diabetes.

‘At first, no-one at the school was sure what to do – it’s a small school, but a receptionist has taken on the responsibilty. Children with Type 1 diabetes may look healthy and run around, but it could be 10 minutes from going badly wrong, if sugar levels aren’t monitored.’

The Department of Health is running a consultation called ‘managing medicines in schools and early years settings’.

It wants schools to support children with medical conditions such as asthma, epilepsy and Type 1 diabetes.

If approved, schools would comply from this September, and put in place a system to help manage children’s long-term condition.

Charlie Ward, four, has Type 1 diabetes, and is due to start school this year.

His father Glenn, 39, of Hazleworth Drive, Gosport, is backing the consultation.

He said: ‘We need to make sure Charlie is being looked after at school, and get the care he needs.

‘My wife and I work full-time, so will rely on his school to be confident in monitoring his condition.

‘He needs five injections a day, and one of those will be at lunchtime.

‘Charlie doesn’t always tell people if his levels are going too high or low, so we would need the school to help.’