Portchester doctors’ surgery told to improve after inspectors find dirty waiting room

editorial image

Concerns raised over elderly care

5
Have your say

A DOCTORS’ surgery that had a dirty waiting room has been told it ‘requires improvement’.

Portchester Practice in West Street, was given the second-worst rank by the Care Quality Commission after officers visited the site in December.

Inspectors found there was no infection control policy in place and areas of the waiting room were visibly dirty, not all staff received regular appraisals and more needs to be done so that staff are able to give 
feedback.

The practice was given a ‘requires improvement’ rating for safety and effectiveness.

But it was given a rating of ‘good’ for caring for patients and responding to people’s needs categories.

Professor Steve Field, chief inspector of general practice, said in the report that patients were treated with compassion, dignity and respect.

He added: ‘We saw staff treated patients with kindness and respect, and maintained confidentiality.

‘All the patients we spoke with praised the caring and professional GPs and nurses and their ability to respond to both young and older patients’ needs promptly.

‘Most patients commented positively on the way GPs and nurses listened to them and the way they explained their diagnosis or medicines.

‘They added they didn’t feel rushed or wasting anybody’s time.’

Dr Helen Lees is a practice partner at the surgery.

She said: ‘We’re disappointed with the overall rating and we’re making an action plan to address the areas highlighted.

‘We’re in talks with our commissioners the Fareham and Gosport Clinical Commissioning Group to address the concerns.

‘It was good to see that patients felt they are getting the right care, that we look after them and they felt they are being treated with respect.’

The CQC said the practice must:

n Ensure there is a system of regular appraisals and training and that personal development plans are in place for all staff;

n Ensure there is an infection control policy and systems in place to monitor infection control procedures and the quality of environmental cleaning and have a policy for the management, testing and investigation of legionella;

n Ensure there are mechanisms in place to seek feedback from staff and this feedback is responded to;

n Ensure the surgery is aware of the risks in relation to the premises as part of its lease and use of the property to include the environment and emergency systems, meeting the needs of the practice and safety of the patients.

The CQC brought in Ofsted-style inspections in October. Practices are given ratings in five different areas helping to form an overall rating that can be either outstanding, good, requires improvement or inadequate.

Back to the top of the page