Portsmouth charities given a cash boost thanks to health trust’s grants

Volunteer Roland Eden at Off The Record in Havant
Volunteer Roland Eden at Off The Record in Havant

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CHARITIES that help provide better health outcomes will benefit from a slice of almost £250,000.

The Portsmouth Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), which is in charge of buying in health care for the city, has agreed to make grants to 15 organisations.

The health group felt the bids for funding demonstrated a significant contribution to its health strategy.

Dr Jim Hogan, the CCG’s chief clinical officer, said: ‘We received some terrific bids from new and ongoing projects and, in an ideal world, it would have been great if we could have been able to financially support many more organisations.

‘But we have allocated funds to projects that we believe will make the most significant contributions to our plans for improving the health of the city.

‘We’ve always told the not-for-profit and voluntary sectors that we really value a lot of the great work which we know they do – and hopefully this funding helps to show them that we mean it.

‘More importantly, this money will be used to help improve the lives and health of a significant number of people across many walks of life in Portsmouth, particularly children, young people, families, the elderly and disadvantaged.’

One of the organisations set to benefit is The Elizabeth Foundation, which is based in the grounds of Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, and helps babies and children with hearing problems.

Trust fundraiser Karen Vaughan said: ‘The grant has enabled us to start a trial project providing education and welfare sessions to young children affected by unilateral/conductive hearing loss – commonly known as glue ear.

‘This grant will have a direct and positive impact on the life’s of children affected by conductive hearing loss and who have previously been isolated from vital support services.

‘It develop their language and social skills whilst having fun.’