Portsmouth GP says farewell after 36 years in the job

GOING Dr Simon Wernick, left, with Brian and Tina Gauntlett. Picture: Allan Hutchings (123012-580)
GOING Dr Simon Wernick, left, with Brian and Tina Gauntlett. Picture: Allan Hutchings (123012-580)
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HE HAS examined thousands of throats, ears and eyes but now one Cosham doctor has decided to hang up his stethoscope after almost four decades.

Dr Simon Wernick, 59, has been a GP at the North Harbour Medical Group for 31 years.

Qualifying in 1976, he joined the Vectis Road practice in 1981, and has been in the profession for 36 years.

This Friday will be his last day working as a GP.

He said: ‘There’s no history in the family of being a doctor, it was just something I always wanted to do.

‘I enjoy the relationship with patients and staff and the on-going care.

‘I like the challenge and the responsibility and I’ve found it really enjoyable.

‘It has been wonderful and I will miss the patients and staff, but now it’s time to move on.

‘With some patients I’ve seen their children and then their children’s children – I will miss them.’

During his time as a GP, Dr Wernick has helped train new GPs and has taken a special interest in asthma care for children and adults.

He said: ‘I was a GP trainer for 12 years where I took juniors and helped them.

‘I also helped to run a post-graduate centre for 11 years.

‘My other area is looking at asthma in adults and children.

‘I have been a lead on that with training and been part of the Portsmouth Paediatric Asthma Group.’

Qualifying at the age of 23, Dr Wernick recalled feeling awkward when he was presented a gift for doing his job.

‘I remember a patient coming in with a very low pulse,’ he said.

‘I sent them to the hospital and they were fitted with a pacemaker.

‘They got me a bottle of champagne to say thank you, when all I did was take their pulse.’

Dr Wernick is looking forward to spending more time with his three grandchildren.

He is the lead for mental health and dementia for the Portsmouth Clinical Commissioning Group, which will replace primary care trusts next April to buy in healthcare for the city.

The practice is holding a lunch for Dr Wernick and patients at 12.30pm on Friday.