Portsmouth mum’s anger as government says no to vCJD probe

Christine Lord has hit out at the government. 'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143153-5)
Christine Lord has hit out at the government. 'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143153-5)

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HEARTBROKEN mum Christine Lord has criticised the government for rejecting five recommendations which she says would save thousands of lives.

Her son Andrew died from the human form of mad cow disease, vCJD, in 2007 aged 24.

ANDY LORD MAD COW DISEASE REP CS''mad cow disease story ahead of Mother's Day - Christine Lord and son Andrew Black,  Andrew and Christine on holiday in New York and Andrew dying from VCJD aged 24. ENGPPP00120111205111721

ANDY LORD MAD COW DISEASE REP CS''mad cow disease story ahead of Mother's Day - Christine Lord and son Andrew Black, Andrew and Christine on holiday in New York and Andrew dying from VCJD aged 24. ENGPPP00120111205111721

She has campaigned ever since to raise awareness of the condition and of the dangers of blood donation without screening for the disease.

Ms Lord, of Highland Terrace, Southsea, said: ‘Everybody is worried about Ebola but we’re recycling this awful disease – it’s a huge ticking time bomb that needs to be addressed urgently.

‘David Cameron is ignoring a potential epidemic that is taking place right on his doorstep.’

Ms Lord’s son went blind, suffered dementia and become quadriplegic as a result of being infected with vCJD, which is caused by eating beef infected by bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

The disease has an incubation period of up to 50 years, during which time many people give blood, which means the disease can be recycled.

An inquiry was held earlier this year in which MPs from the Science and Technology Committee made recommendations for the government to look at carrying out further research and putting in extra safeguards, such as a large-scale blood test.

It recommended that the government investigated whether some cases of dementia are actually CJD being misdiagnosed, especially in the elderly.

These recommendations were rejected in October.

Despite this, Ms Lord said she was determined to carry on and she has written a book about her son.

The 57-year-old said: ‘I remain determined and upbeat. My evidence is now in the archives of Hansard, my book is selling well on Amazon and my investigations are on track and gaining more momentum.

‘When Andrew was dying he asked me to find out who was responsible for his illness and also to protect other families. I continue to honour those promises.’

Ms Lord’s book Who Killed My Son? is available to buy on Amazon, Kindle and at Blackwell’s at Portsmouth University.