‘Supporters help make UK’s end-of-life care best in world’, says Hampshire hospice

Naomi House at Sutton Scotney north of Winchester unveiled its superb new building last month after a �4m fundraising project that started in 20. ''Mikey Strachan (3) from Stubbington who has a life limiting illness with his family '(left to right) Mika Strachan (6)Chevonne Newlands (34), Mikey Strachan (3), Gregor Newlands (13), Skye Strachan (4), and George Strachan (28)''Picture by:  Malcolm Wells (150907-3585)
Naomi House at Sutton Scotney north of Winchester unveiled its superb new building last month after a �4m fundraising project that started in 20. ''Mikey Strachan (3) from Stubbington who has a life limiting illness with his family '(left to right) Mika Strachan (6)Chevonne Newlands (34), Mikey Strachan (3), Gregor Newlands (13), Skye Strachan (4), and George Strachan (28)''Picture by: Malcolm Wells (150907-3585)

READER’S LETTER: Will sugary diets effect life expectancy?

1
Have your say

END-of-life care in the UK is the best in the world, according to a major survey.

The study of 80 countries said thanks to the NHS and the hospice movement the care provided was ‘second to none’.

Locally for The Rowans, in Purbrook, and Naomi House, in Winchester, care for hundreds of people both in their homes and in the hospices. Millions of pounds are raised each year for hospices which largely rely on donations from the public.

Keith Wilson, from Naomi House, said: ‘While it is reassuring to hear that the UK’s provision of palliative care fares well against other countries, we must be careful not to rest on our laurels.

‘Medicines, therapies and clinical practices are changing at a fast rate and if the UK wants to keep ahead of the curve we must continually evolve. At Naomi House & Jacksplace we are reaching out to more children and young adults than ever before.

‘This is thanks to a continuous programme of staff development, investment in our buildings and technology and a collaborative approach to providing flexible care at the point of need, and it is our supporters that are making this possible.’

The report for the Economist Intelligence Unit, put Australia and New Zealand in second and third place respectively.

Author Annie Pannelay said: ‘The UK is an acknowledged leader in palliative care. That reflects its comprehensive strategy towards the issue as well as the improvements that are being made.

‘But there is more that the UK could do to stay at the forefront of palliative care standards, such as ironing out occasional problems with communication or symptom control.’