Teacher Danielle Travis speaks of boyfriend’s decision to end his life ahead of the Assisted Dying Bill reading

Warren Hinde and Danielle Travis
Warren Hinde and Danielle Travis
From left, Terence Rierkert, Matt Chapman, Steve Kramer, Dan Deeks, Theresa Newstead, Simon Freeman and Josh Roux
Picture: Ian Hargreaves (170948-1)

Portsmouth friends to tackle 101-mile walk for man with cancer

  • Warren Hinde was just 27 when he was diagnosed with a rare form of liver cancer and 29 when he died
  • Hospice boss is against the Assisted Dying Bill
  • Fareham MP will make a stand against the bill
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IT WAS a decision that gave him choice and empowerment.

For Danielle Travis she could see why her boyfriend Warren Hinde believed the only option for him six years ago was to travel to a euthanasia clinic in Switzerland.

Warren was really suffering and being able to have the option of going to Switzerland to have euthanasia gave him choice, which had been denied him by the brutal cancer

Danielle Travis, 37

Today – on the day parliament discuss the Assisted Dying Bill – 37-year-old Danielle, of Eastern Villas Road, Southsea, shares her story on how having the decision to die helped her partner.

Danielle, a teacher, said: ‘Warren was 27 when he was diagnosed with a rare form of liver cancer. He was 29 when he died.

‘We were both devastated when we found out. We had just settled down together in Portsmouth and were really happy.

‘It shattered our world. His loving family were heartbroken too.

‘Warren was really suffering and being able to have the option of going to Switzerland to have euthanasia gave him choice, which had been denied him by the brutal cancer.

‘It was empowering in a way and very brave of him to make that journey.

‘It was definitely right for Warren and it was good he could choose.

‘I think each case should be looked at closely and if doctors in the UK were to start offering euthanasia, it should be closely monitored and reviewed by ethical boards.’

If the bill was adopted by parliament it would mean a terminally-ill patient – who has less than six months to live – could be prescribed and aided in taking a lethal medication to end their life.

The decision would need to be approved at the High Court and two healthcare professionals would be involved.

But Ruth White, chief executive of The Rowans Hospice, said assisting someone to die would go against the very nature of being a healthcare professional.

She said: ‘Those who support the bill are describing this as a “compassionate” act.

‘Compassion is a term the hospice movement and all health professionals are familiar with and is synonymous with hospice care.

‘I question whether supporting suicide is a compassionate act if you are a health professional, as doctors and nurses have been taught to do no harm and to maintain quality in life.

‘There are many people who receive care from the hospice team who fear their care plans and prescribed medications may speed up the process of dying.

‘This is a myth hospice care staff contend with on a regular basis, so how would it be if they had the ability to support suicide as well as maintain a quality of life until a natural end?’

Fareham MP Suella Fernandes said she would be opposing the bill today.

‘I’m not persuaded there is sufficient protection in place to prevent inappropriate use of the right,’ she said.

‘International experience shows this kind of legislation is being used for reasons other than pain, by people who are not terminally-ill and by other people who do not want to be a burden on their loved ones. The overwhelming expert and professional opinion opposes assisted dying.’