Toddler Dominic Fuller gets to see the Children’s Air Ambulance that brought him home to Portsmouth

Dominic Fuller with mum Rachel and dad Andy
Dominic Fuller with mum Rachel and dad Andy
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  • Tot was born two months early 225 miles away from Portsmouth
  • Air ambulance flew him to QA’s neonatal intensive care unit
  • Family had the chance to visit air base in Coventry
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TRADITIONALLY it’s a stork that delivers a baby home, but the Fuller family’s fairytale ending came about thanks to an air ambulance.

Two years ago Dominic Fuller was born 230 miles away from his Portsmouth home in Lincolnshire.

It was very emotional to see the helicopter again

Mum Rachel Fuller

He weighed just 3lb 10oz, and needed to be in hospital for several weeks before he could go home.

So in order to get him closer to his parents Andy and Rachel, who live in Chichester Road, North End, the Children’s Air Ambulance delivered him to Portsmouth.

And two years on, the family were invited to the air base in Coventry to see the craft that brought Dominic home.

Mum Rachel, 43, a sheltered housing manager, said: ‘It was very emotional to see the helicopter again.

‘I wasn’t sure how I was going to react when I saw it at first, because it was such a difficult time, but it was lovely to meet all the staff and show Dominic the helicopter that helped him get home to us safely.’

Dominic got to have a go at being a pilot as he sat in the cockpit of the helicopter transfer service, as well as see the air ambulance up close a second time.

Dad Andy, 44, a railway worker, said: ‘Dominic had a great time running around and looking at everything.

‘It was emotional to see it again – the air ambulance and its crew helped keep our family together.’

Andy and Rachel had gone to Louth for a break, in October 2013, and Dominic was not due until December.

But he arrived two months early, and was taken to the Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimsby.

Dominic was born within four minutes and taken to the intensive care unit.

Doctors said Dominic would need to be in hospital for several weeks, but recognised the need for him to be closer to home.

Facing a five-hour drive would have proved too much for the tiny tot, so that’s when the Children’s Air Ambulance stepped in and airlifted him to Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham.

Dominic’s 225-mile flight to QA took one hour and 20 minutes.

He stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit and came home just in time for Christmas.

The air ambulance receives no government funding. To find out more visit childrensairambulance.org.uk