Waterlooville mum hails midwife a hero after she saved her unborn baby

Nikki Legg, left, with her children Jameson and Alice, with QA midwife Ann Going

Nikki Legg, left, with her children Jameson and Alice, with QA midwife Ann Going

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  • Mum praises actions of heroic midwife who saved her unborn baby
  • Tot suffered a life-threatening stroke in the womb
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A MUM has praised a quick-thinking nurse at Queen Alexandra Hospital for saving her unborn baby boy after he had a life-threatening stroke while in her womb.

Nikki Legg, 29, says her strong bond with specialist diabetic midwife Ann Going at the Cosham hospital was key in saving her beloved boy Jameson.

Being able to hold my baby for the first time when he was nine-days-old was an incredible feeling, and I felt as though I owed Ann so much. If it wasn’t for her quick-thinking then Jameson would have died.

Nikki Legg, 29, of Waterlooville

Dental nurse Nikki, from Waterlooville, has Type 1 diabetes and spent months with Ann, who checked her blood sugar level to make sure it was safe for her to conceive.

Ann monitored Nikki’s pregnancy throughout, and because Nikki’s baby was growing at a faster rate than normal, she underwent monthly scans.

At 37 weeks, and just two days after having a scan that showed the baby was fine, Nikki couldn’t feel her unborn son move.

Horrified, she was rushed to QA for an emergency scan. While in the hospital she was spotted by Ann, who grew increasingly concerned about the baby’s lack of movement.

After a brief spate of tests, the quick-thinking midwife took the brave call to organise an emergency C-section procedure in a bid to save Nikki’s child.

Baby Jameson was born 20 minutes after arriving into theatre weighing a whopping 10lb 1oz, but was incredibly unwell and was not breathing.

‘It took six minutes for the team to resuscitate Jameson, and my heart was in my hands throughout,’ said Nikki.

‘I felt so powerless as I laid on the operating table watching a huge team of people revive my son.’

Baby Jameson was taken to the neonatal unit where he stayed for two weeks.

Tests later revealed a lack of blood flow through the placenta had led to him having a bleed on the brain, which prompted the stroke. The stroke had nothing to do with Nikki’s diabetes.

Jameson is now aged three, has part cerebral palsy and walks with a frame, but despite the odds he is thriving.

Nikki added: ‘Being able to hold my baby for the first time when he was nine days old was an incredible feeling, and I felt as though I owed Ann so much.

‘If it wasn’t for her quick-thinking then Jameson would have died.’

She added the tot’s development was slightly delayed and that he couldn’t crawl until he was two. But despite his traumatic start to life, the youngster has no speech or behavioural problems as had been feared. The toddler’s biggest issue is mobility on his weaker left side – which has been improving with regular physiotherapy sessions at QA.

‘He has limitations – he can’t dress himself for example, but it’s all about training his brain to accept everyday movements so that in the future he will eventually be able to do those everyday things, it’s a gradual thing,’ said Nikki.

Last year Nikki decided she wanted another baby so went back to Ann who again monitored her blood sugar level until it was safe for her to conceive.

Ann once again monitored the pregnancy throughout and at 38 weeks baby Alice arrived into the world a healthy, happy baby weighing 9lb 6oz.

She felt the care given by Ann was incredible and that other expectant mothers with diabetes had nothing to fear at QA.

‘In my eyes Ann has gone above and beyond in her role as a midwife and my family will be forever grateful to her,’ she added.

The risks to the mum of being diabetic can include an increased risk of miscarriage, problems with their eyes and kidneys, and having a large baby, which can make labour more difficult.

For the baby, risks include health problems after birth requiring special or intensive care, as well as the possibility of congenital abnormalities including heart problems, spina bifida and other birth defects.

There is also an increased risk of stillbirth or the baby dying shortly after birth. These risks are reduced if women attend for pre-pregnancy.

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