Workers challenged on booze levels

From left, Terence Rierkert, Matt Chapman, Steve Kramer, Dan Deeks, Theresa Newstead, Simon Freeman and Josh Roux
Picture: Ian Hargreaves (170948-1)

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WORKERS took part in a challenge to see if they know how many units of alcohol they are pouring for themselves.

Portsmouth City Council’s public health team visited 1000 Lakeside business park in North Harbour and invited people to take part in the Pour Challenge.

Suzanne Lewis project team manager at EBP at Lakeside with Steve Padley alcohol intervention practitioner for Portsmouth City Council

Suzanne Lewis project team manager at EBP at Lakeside with Steve Padley alcohol intervention practitioner for Portsmouth City Council

Participants were asked to pour what they thought was a unit of wine, a unit of beer or a unit of spirits.

This was then tipped into a measuring cup and people were shown how their pour compared to an actual one-unit measure.

Jamie Earley, 28, is a solicitor for Coffin Mew.

He said: ‘I usually have about five bottles of beer a week, on a Friday night after the working week is done.

‘That came up at about three units each, and a daily recommendation is three to four.

‘As I only drink once a week and use all the units, it can be classed as binge drinking.

‘The perception of a binge drinker is someone who goes out and has loads at the weekend and makes a nuisance of themselves.

‘I usually drink at home rather than being in a pub.’

Nationally, it is recommended the maximum daily allowances for women are two to three units, and for men three to four units.

Hairdresser Summer Billings, 18, said she was surprised at how many units she had been pouring herself.

Her measure of a single unit of a spirit was shown to be a double.

She said: ‘Before a night out I would probably have about four drinks and would pour what I would think is a single.

‘To find out I’m having about 500 calories before I even go out is pretty disgusting.

‘It has made me think twice about how much I’m pouring for myself.’

The National Liver Disease Information Service says alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in England, in 2012/13 there were 954 alcohol-specific hospital admissions in Portsmouth – higher than the national average of 740.

Russell Bleach, practice lead for the council’s alcohol intervention team, said: ‘We’re trying to make people more aware of how much they might be drinking.

‘It’s easy to pour yourself extra when you’re at home and often if you have a glass of wine, it might get topped up before you finish, so it makes it harder to count.

‘We want people to also have two alcohol-free days in the week.’