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Report finds ‘little evidence’ of Hampshire Police investigation into some offences

Hampshire Police have been accused of failing to properly investigate some offences

Hampshire Police have been accused of failing to properly investigate some offences

 

INSPECTORS have told Hampshire police they found little evidence of investigation for some crimes.

HM Inspectorate of Constabulary has published a report into forces across the country but has also written to forces individually.

In the letter to Hampshire police Zoe Billingham, from HMIC, said: ‘In certain cases, for crimes such as burglary dwellings, there was clear evidence of investigation and supervision.

‘However, for other offences (many of which were not attended) some cases were found to have little evidence of meaningful investigation or supervision.’

The letter does not specify which offences are causing concern in Hampshire but it comes as Inspector of Constabulary Roger Baker, who led the inspection, warned that high-volume offences, such as criminal damage or vehicle crime, are nearly decriminalised.

He said: ‘It’s more a mindset, that we no longer deal with these things. And effectively what’s happened is a number of crimes are on the verge of being decriminalised.”

‘So it’s not the fault of the individual staff, it’s a mindset thing that’s crept in to policing to say “we’ve almost given up”.’

Ms Billingham’s letter to Hampshire police also notes the force does not have a policy to attend all reports of crimes and incidents.

The force instead considers the threat, risk and harm to victims and the community.

She praised the force in the majority of areas, including working on long term crime prevention with organised crime groups.

Hampshire Police have been approached for comment by The News after the report was published today.

Are you dissatisfied with the way in which Hampshire Police responded to a crime you reported? Ring reporter Ben Fishwick on 01329 243004 or email ben.fishwick@thenews.co.uk

 

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