Love Your Local: The Good Intent, Fareham

Pearl and Fred Barrie having a drink in The Good Intent. Below, Katy and Daniel Bricknell. Pictures: Ian Hargreaves (143565-4)
Pearl and Fred Barrie having a drink in The Good Intent. Below, Katy and Daniel Bricknell. Pictures: Ian Hargreaves (143565-4)

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It prides itself on having the community’s best interests at heart.

And now The Good Intent, in Trinity Street, Fareham, is keen to do even more for the people it serves.

16/12/14  KB''The Good Intent public house in Fareham. The landlord and landlady, Daniel and Katy Bricknell.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143565-2) PPP-141216-163949003

16/12/14 KB''The Good Intent public house in Fareham. The landlord and landlady, Daniel and Katy Bricknell.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143565-2) PPP-141216-163949003

The venue is having a refit in January and the focus is on making the venue look and feel more like a traditional local, fitting in with its family atmosphere.

Daniel Bricknell took over the lease of the pub from Solent Pub Company in October.

Daniel, 31, and his partner Katy, 26, have since been hard at work ensuring it becomes a hub for the community and doesn’t attract the wrong crowd.

The couple have stripped Sky Sports coverage from the pub and introduced a jacket potato oven behind the bar so customers can choose which type of potato they would like for their meal.

16/12/14  KB''The Good Intent public house in Fareham.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143565-1) PPP-141216-163916003

16/12/14 KB''The Good Intent public house in Fareham.'Picture: Ian Hargreaves (143565-1) PPP-141216-163916003

Two real ales are on tap and the pub has been awarded cask marque accreditation for the quality of the beers its serves.

‘We’ve changed the clientele and make it a more welcoming and friendly environment,’ Daniel said.

‘We are realistic and we know it will take time before it is back to how it should be.

‘It’s all coming together quite well.’

And the couple’s children Phoebe, 10 months, and Ebony, six, have also proved a hit with customers.

‘It’s a family-run pub and all the locals know the children by their first names,’ Daniel said. ‘It’s got the potential to be really successful.

‘There’s not a lot of family run pubs any more, there’s a lot of the big pub chain venues.

‘We are trying to bring the pub back to its roots and there’s a massive gap in the market for community locals.

‘We are all almost like a family here. A lot of the customers pour out their heart to us, we know their life story.’

Plans are also in place to hold a music day featuring eight bands for charity next year, as well as a beer festival.

Wilfred Phillips, 80, enjoys stopping by for a drink at The Good Intent.

He started going there after setting up an equality group and holding its meetings there. While it has now moved premises, Wilfred still enjoys having a beer.

Talking about what he likes about the pub, he said: ‘It’s clean. Everything is always absolutely spotless.

‘The landlord is trying his best to get rid of certain type of people that in the past have caused more trouble than drank beer – and that I appreciate. I always find the beer is much to my liking.’

Meet the landlord

EXPERIENCED pub landlord Daniel Bricknell said taking over the lease of The Good Intent was a ‘natural step’ in his profession.

Daniel had already been working at the Fareham pub as its manager prior to gaining more control of the business.

And before that he had been working in pubs run by firms including Greene King and Marston’s for 10 years.

Daniel said: ‘It was a natural step from being a pub manager for so long.

‘It was a risk taking on a business, especially with the way things in the pub trade are going, but we will see what 2015 brings.’

Talking about how things have changed since the takeover, Daniel said: ‘It’s an easier way of life now. I don’t see it as a career or as a job.

‘It’s quite easy to build your life around the pub trade – it is your life.

‘A lot of people don’t realise you are up at 7am each day sorting out the beer, rather than just turning up at 11am when the pub is open to the public.

‘When you shut the pub at midnight, you are then often up cleaning and sorting things out until 2am to 3am.’

Daniel said the way more pubs will survive in future is if they are taken over by the community or by people who have a passion for the people they serve.

‘We need to take pubs back to how the customers want them to be,’ he said.

‘They need to be part of the community and everyone needs to work together.’

The pub will hold a party and Christmas raffle on Christmas Eve.