Lynne praised for fundraising

Lynne Cainel with her  'knitted chick egg warmers''' ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (141538-1498)
Lynne Cainel with her 'knitted chick egg warmers''' ''Picture: Malcolm Wells (141538-1498)
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SUPERSTAR fundraiser Lynne Caine has been knitting chicks to raise cash for 30 years.

And now she’s been thanked by the charity she has raised thousands of pounds for.

The 68-year-old sells knitted chicks to raise money for Basics Hampshire – a charity of volunteers to help the critically-ill or injured before they reach hospital.

The retired civil servant said: ‘I’ve always enjoyed knitting these chicks, although it’s quite an effort having to do so many.

‘I’ve been a chief fundraiser for Basics for a while now. It’s a wonderful and vitally important charity.

‘I would like to thank Heather Tickner, Barbara Biggs, Hazel Roxbrough, and Jenny, who all helped form a wonderful team for this year’s marathon knitting push.

‘I’d also like to thank the mystery knitters who dropped knitted chicks off in my letterbox.’

As previously reported in The News, Mrs Caine was awarded a British Empire Medal for her efforts.

Jay Andrews, speaking on behalf of Basics Hampshire, said: ‘Lynne always has brilliant ideas for different ways of fundraising and the chicks aren’t the half of it, though she’s probably knitting chicks even now for next year and getting her brilliant team to support her.

‘They must have make thousands of them. Everyone in Basics Hampshire and the charity world admire her.

‘It’s no wonder she got the British Empire Medal this year.’

Mrs Caine was awarded the honour earlier this year for her outstanding efforts to charity, and has also been invited to a garden party at Buckingham Palace on June 10. Basics fund a specialist kit and team of highly-trained critical care medics who can intervene in the vital moments before patients reach hospital.

Mrs Caine, of Bryony Way, Waterlooville, has been knitting chicks for Easter for around 30 years, which she fills with a chocolate egg.

They are sold around the country for £1 each. Her efforts have just been totalled this year, and have made nearly £1,300, so far, growing from around £700 in previous years.’