Mum and son’s vintage car run to aid Rowans Hospice’s Dorothy’s Dream appeal

113489-581 OLDSMOBILE (PM) MRW 2/10/2011''John Wilton (63) with his superb example of a 1902 Oldsmobile ''John has entered this year's London to Brighton run in November and will be taking his mum...Marie Wilton (86) as his passenger....I hope it does not rain Marie !'''Picture: Malcolm Wells (113489-581
113489-581 OLDSMOBILE (PM) MRW 2/10/2011''John Wilton (63) with his superb example of a 1902 Oldsmobile ''John has entered this year's London to Brighton run in November and will be taking his mum...Marie Wilton (86) as his passenger....I hope it does not rain Marie !'''Picture: Malcolm Wells (113489-581
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IT HAS no doors, no seatbelts and can reach a top speed of 25mph – but the vintage Oldsmobile will be taking part in an historic race.

The motor – built in 1902 – will join a fleet of around 500 cars made before 1904, taking part in the London to Brighton Emancipation Run on November 5.

The run commemorates the day the speed limit was raised from 4mph to 14mph for light automotives in November 1896.

Owner John Wilton, 63, of The Crossway, Portchester, has been taking part in the race for the past 18 years.

But this time he will be taking his mother Marie, 85, as a passenger, to raise money for the Rowans Hospice’s Dorothy’s Dream hospice at home campaign.

Marie, a retired midwife, also of The Crossway, Portchester, said: ‘I’m being sponsored to take part in the run and I’m doing it for Dorothy’s Dream.

‘My daughter Kate died 11 years ago in a hospice in Kent and we were with her in her last few days.

‘She died a week after her 40th birthday from cancer, which had started in her breast and then spread to other parts of her body.

‘If the service had been available for us we would’ve used it.

‘That’s why I support the Dorothy’s Dream cause.’

The Rowans Hospice, in Purbrook, launched the Dorothy’s Dream campaign to fund a new service which allows terminally-ill people to choose if they would like to die in their homes.

Last September a massive fundraising drive was started to raise £1m to make this happen.

So far £750,000 has been generated and a home service team of 13 nurses and health care support workers have been taken on.

But £250,000 still needs to be raised in order to keep the new service running.

‘Some people don’t want to go into a hospice, added Ms Wilton.

‘It can be quite a strain on families to look after a person in the last few days, so they need proper support.’