New homes at Horndean ‘will mean village becomes town’

Peter Payne looking at plans at a public exhibition held by East Hampshire District Council at Merchistoun Hall, Horndean to give residents the opportunity to see the locations of possible development sites.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (14874-938) PPP-140321-211324001
Peter Payne looking at plans at a public exhibition held by East Hampshire District Council at Merchistoun Hall, Horndean to give residents the opportunity to see the locations of possible development sites.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (14874-938) PPP-140321-211324001

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CONCERNS over whether a village has the right infrastructure to take hundreds of new homes have been voiced by neighbours.

Scores of people attended a consultation at Merchistoun Hall held by East Hampshire District Council, on where 700 new homes should be built in Horndean.

Plots of land have been put forward by landowners keen to have them included in the council’s land allocations plan. The plan will provide a blueprint for future development across the area.

Of all the areas put forward, an overwhelming number of people highlighted the Hazleton Farm site, south east of the Morrisons junction on the A3M, as the preferred development site.

And there was strong feeling about sites they don’t want built on.

Geoff Lambert, of Tarbery Crescent, said fields off Downhouse Road was the wrong site for housing.

‘We do appreciate that people have to have homes’, said Mr Lambert. ‘My concern is they may not put the facilities in to support them.

‘Downhouse Road has beautiful views of the South Downs. And it’s off a fast road. I’m surprised it’s being considered. I would be upset if that site was developed.’

Peter Payne, 66, of Five Heads Road, said: ‘I simply don’t think there is the infrastructure in this area to take 700 new homes.

‘They talk up the closeness to the motorway a lot, and the transport links, but in Five Heads Road there isn’t even a footpath.

‘It feels like Horndean’s becoming less like a village and more like a town.’

And there is still strong opposition to plans for 220 new homes at White Dirt Farm where a planning application is expected to be submitted by Taylor Wimpey within months.

Next month the government’s planning inspector is expected to rubber-stamp East Hampshire’s Joint Core Strategy, which proposes a target of 10,060 new homes across East Hampshire by 2028.

The consultation on where the homes should be built could go on for two years.