Chinks of light among the Fratton darkness

Pompey players visit the children's wards at Queen Alexandra hospital Sam Merrick (3) and his dad Paul are visited by (left to right) Aaron Mokoena, Ricardo Rocha, Marko Futacs, George Thorne, Kanu and Benjani  Picture:Steve Reid
Pompey players visit the children's wards at Queen Alexandra hospital Sam Merrick (3) and his dad Paul are visited by (left to right) Aaron Mokoena, Ricardo Rocha, Marko Futacs, George Thorne, Kanu and Benjani Picture:Steve Reid
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Pompey’s proud name is back in the dirt once again.

But among the incessant torrent of negativity we are all so well versed in dealing with, arrive the occasional gems of positivity.

Just ask young Connor Hooper, a three-year-old asthmatic who has been laid up in hospital with a chest infection.

Or try Sam Merrick, another patient in Queen Alexandra’s paediatric ward who faces a bone marrow transplant as he battles his immune deficiency.

And what about nine-year-old Yusif Ulucan, the Pompey fan who is coming to terms with spending Christmas in hospital after breaking his femur?

It’s fair to say the club will take any positive PR it can get at the moment, so their annual visit to QA probably arrived at the right time.

The fact, for the second year in a row, there was a full turn out earlier this week speaks well of the current crop of players, though. That hasn’t always been the case. Not by a long shot.

The impact their presence has cannot be understated on the youngsters they come across.

Seeing Joe Mattock – not the brightest, according to his manager Michael Appleton – going way beyond the call of duty to spend time with Hooper and put a smile on his face was genuinely heart-warming.

It may not save the club, but witnessing the events on Monday was enough to lift the heaviest of hearts just a little.

Pompey can actually do feelgood still.

On a more practical front arrive the Fans’ Conference, who are now mobilising in the light of recent events.

The various supporter groups are now organised into a single voice which is asking all the right questions of the club, in a positive move.

They met with Pompey chief executive David Lampitt on Saturday ahead of the Coventry clash.

Lampitt gave honest answers to the vast and far-reaching questions that were thrown in his direction.

That may have made for some bleak listening, with the urgency of the investment needed to keep the club afloat clearly apparent.

It’s clear that when it’s said the money is in place to keep Pompey running in the short-term – that means the very short-term.

The fact a lot of noise will need to be made to put the spotlight on the club’s plight has been highlighted by more militant supporters.

There is talk of a protest landing on the Football League’s doorstep for the manner in which they deemed Pompey’s owners to be ‘fit and proper’.

The football family are ready to join forces and stand squarely with the followers of the star and crescent, too, as and when that stand is made.

Fans of clubs like Chelsea, Manchester United and Crystal Palace, to name a few, have given their assurances they will be present for any march on Gloucester Place.

Meanwhile, Fratton faithful’s hardcore have sensed the need to fight is necessary once again, and responded to the call-to-arms.

The Pompey Trust has witnessed a big uptake in membership since it has became apparent how serious the club’s problems are.

Realities tell you it will be money which talks loudest right now in the search for the answer to the Blues’ woes. Quick money.

But the actions of Pompey’s fans and players in recent days have provided a few rare chinks of light in the darkness which again envelopes the club.