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First it was 'the Rachel'. Then it was Kate Moss's fringe. Now it's Kate Middleton's impossibly pristine locks that are spawning copy-cat cuttings.

It turns out that women can't pick their own hair styles – we have to look to the famous for a nudge in the right direction first.

Hair salons in New York have been over-run with ladies asking to be given the future queen's crop.

It really can't be that much longer before women all over the UK start tossing similar glossy, chocolate brown, manes around as they walk down the high street.

Of course it won't look exactly the same without the expensive clothes, designer handbag or prince, but that won't stop them.

Ten years ago hairdressers were getting bored of making everyone look like Jennifer Aniston with the shaggy number she had when she played Rachel Green in Friends.

But it's not such a new phenomena really. You had the Joanna Lumley 'Purdy' cut – and my own mother used to sport a look made popular by the character Jan Howard, from the south coast's answer to Dallas, Howards' Way.

When I was about 10, she did the same thing to me, taking me to a hairdresser and requesting that she give me the same crop as the kid who sang It's Horrible Being In Love When You're Eight and a Half.

It was an horrific song and a pretty hideous haircut.

Obviously I was mortified. It was a pretty naff thing to do. But it was the shame of knowing I'd been given a hair cut purely because it had previously featured on TV that I really couldn't get over.

Men get off easy. The days of going to the barber clutching a picture of Limahl are long gone. Mullets are no longer the done thing.

Blokes all look the same now. There's very little to distinguish Colin Firth's hair cut from Jude Law's.

And that is what's most annoying about the female obsession with copying celebrity looks – there's so much variety that it's really not necessary for us all to look the same.