Divert some of the millions to help us poor commuters

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September is always a time of stress – with children going back to school and budgets not quite matching up because of new uniforms, music lessons, etc, etc).

But added to that is the thought of going back to work.

A lot of queueing at roadworks is caused by a peculiar British trait of not pulling in front of someone else when lanes merge into one

I’m a long-distance commuter as I teach at Bournemouth University. So imagine my joy to discover that not only are there going to be roadworks on my route on to the motorway at this end, there are also going to be roadworks coming off at the other end. They made the TV news, which means that they are going to be really, really dire.

I did like the apologetic spokesman’s advice though. Leave early. Allow extra time. What, you think we’ll all leave home at the very last minute knowing that we’ve got 16 million miles of cones to negotiate? Of course, why didn’t I think of that myself?

I often consider whether I should pack myself a care kit to get myself through particularly bad traffic jams – a small stove, some pasta and a jar of pesto.

That’d all keep okay in the boot of my car and I’m quite sure I could fashion a semi-safe cooking space somewhere in the vehicle for those eternally long waits (though straining the pasta out of the window might be a tad tricky).

I have nothing against keeping roads up to scratch, I just wish that some of the millions being spent could somehow be diverted to make it easier for commuters.

Like temporary park and ride schemes, with buses allowed super-fast access down bus-only motorway routes. I’d happily sign up for that. Or reduced train fares to encourage people like me to use public transport.

Then again, a lot of queueing at roadworks is caused by a peculiar British trait of not pulling in front of someone else when lanes merge into one.

If cars use both lanes and take it in turns, traffic keeps flowing. However for some reason two-thirds of our population sit steadfastly in one lane and queue, while a whole other lane lies empty.

Woe betide the errant driver that uses the lane that ends in 300 yards, for they will be blocked out from the upcoming merge. Come on people, use both lanes and merge in turn.