Holidaymakers annoyed by warm weather back home

LAWRENCE MURPHY: Tickle your taste buds for cheap

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Our obsession with the weather continues. After a long, cold and bitter winter, we’re finally getting some sunshine.

As many people depart these shores for a fortnight in search of Mediterranean heat, the fact it’s just as hot in the UK is something that I’m sure will annoy every holidaymaker off to foreign climes.

We want to be sipping a cold beer on the beach in 30C heat, smug in the knowledge that back home it’s raining.

It just doesn’t have the same gloss knowing that conditions in the UK are similar.

Then again, thunderstorms are forecast here, as I write these words from the patio area of our villa on the French-Italian border.

It’s funny how, here, people run for cover in the sun. Shade is the order of the day, especially during the après-midi heat.

But in the UK, we have to be in its full glare.

We take any opportunity to get the roof down on a soft-top car and eat al fresco, even if the evening temperature drops like a stone.

We adore the sun. We can’t get enough of it and when we do get some, we make full use of it.

Sadly, our relationship with the sun can also be very unhealthy.

We forget just how dangerous the sun can be and, as soon as the plane lands in Benidorm or Ibiza, off come our clothes and it’s on with Factor 10, not the 30+ we should be using.

We turn lobster red, but feel revitalised as we apply a thick layer of after-sun lotion to our tight, singed skin.

Then, after a few days of heat, we start to complain. Come on, how many of you have said ‘it’s far too hot’?

Nine months of cold, miserable weather, then a week of the hot stuff and we wilt.

The chilly weather was caused by high pressure becoming ‘stuck’ over the UK and Scandinavia. It stayed for two months.

Now let’s hope that whatever is causing the warm weather gets stuck too – then it’ll still be sunny when we get back!

Aaaah, that fascination with the weather is one of the many things that makes me so proud to be British.