I’d give some to family and friends and head for the hills

Mo Farrah after missing out on a gold medal
				 Picture: Adam Davy

VERITY LUSH: Leave me to browse the make-up counter in peace

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This week I’ve been wondering what I would do with £64m, mainly because someone bought a Euromillions ticket, managed somehow to get the winning numbers and then promptly lost it.

If it was me, I’d have either washed it in my jeans pocket, used it as a chewing gum receptacle, or kept it in my wallet with my unclaimed expenses receipts for about three years.

But it wasn’t my ticket, I haven’t lost out on a life-changing amount and I, like the majority of you, have not jacked in my job, bought my own jet and headed off into the sunset with a couple of be-bronzed beauties with which to pass the time.

But what would I really do with all that money? Would I be prudent enough to invest it and just make more of it (George Osborne allowing)?

Or would I take myself off on a frivolous spending spree, not to return until every last penny has gone?

It doesn’t really matter – it’s unlikely I’ll ever have to make that decision because the odds are against me winning.

But what would give me pause for thought would be a certain ex-Pompey player, who this week told Twitter that he wished he was back on his £100-a-week YTS scheme.

Jamie O’Hara belongs in the bracket of the super-rich, earning £35,000 a week.

But he says his lifestyle is causing too much stress, and he yearns for a simpler life.

I can kind of understand why. His wages are unlikely to last long. He maybe has nine years left of his career, but a lifestyle he’ll want to continue.

He’ll be paying more in tax a month than a lot of us get paid in a year, and he’ll have a mortgage on his mansion, the car collection to maintain, and an image to protect.

Sure, you could say he doesn’t have to have those things. But if you’re really honest with yourself, and all your peers had them, wouldn’t you want them too?

It’s not his fault he gets paid what he does. Like it or not, we’re not the England of 1966 – and we don’t have the wage bills to match.

So what would I do if I won the lottery? I guess I’d give a load of it to my family and friends and then head for the hills.