I love digital news and newspapers

Mo Farrah after missing out on a gold medal
				 Picture: Adam Davy

VERITY LUSH: Leave me to browse the make-up counter in peace

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Eighteen-year-old SAM POOLE goes to Highbury College and lives at Eastney, Portsmouth. Follow him on Twitter 
@shjpoole.

Being a journalist in 2014 is very different from being one in 1914.

Many years ago the newspaper was the king of news and people would buy their favourite title hot off the press in order to find out what was going on.

There was no such thing as the internet or TV. As for radio, it was popular but not a prime source of news.

Printed news had such a powerful impact when the Titanic sunk, as well as moving millions when war broke out.

Completely different pieces of news related to each other by being delivered through a newspaper.

The paper sellers would shout out in the street and bills with headlines on would tempt people to buy.

It was hard to escape the presence of a newspaper as they were everywhere.

Their contents formed the framework of daily discussion.

Today newspapers are still very relevant, but no longer dominant.

Many now get their news from websites such as our own portsmouth.co.uk, accessed via PCs, tablets or smartphones.

Some argue there remains a need for newspapers and that they will survive in the digital age.

But there are other pessimists who see the advancement of the internet eventually leading to the demise of printed news.

As a multimedia journalist in training, I love all things technological.

But I still love reading newspapers too.

Sometimes I’ll buy various newspapers to explore how they approach different stories. I think that’s important.

I hear people say: Why should I buy newspapers when I can get the stories online for free?

Well, my answer is simple: you can hold a newspaper. It feels more personal to me having my own copy and it presents hard facts that can’t be edited once printed.

The fact that I’m training at a newspaper allows me to thoroughly understand the whole operation of both the The News and its website, portsmouth.co.uk.

There is no doubt that today we are living in a multi-media world.

The News is at the forefront of catering for a growing digital audience while still ensuring that the daily paper remains relevant and full of information, entertainment, analysis and insight.

Whatever way you receive the news, I say consume it wisely and acknowledge the importance of understanding it all.