If women want equality, we must sort out our wardrobes

Mo Farrah after missing out on a gold medal
				 Picture: Adam Davy

VERITY LUSH: Leave me to browse the make-up counter in peace

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Somewhere this week I read a blog which mentioned that Mumsnet has joined the fight against Page Three and images of near-naked women in our national press.

I wish I could remember where I saw the blog as I wanted to quote from it, but I’ll paraphrase.

Here goes. Mumsnet said something like Page Three shows us that men make all the news with politics and sport while the role of a woman, her job, is to stand around in pants. That’s why it needs to go.

But it’s not just Page Three. Women are pictured in their undies at every opportunity.

I watched This Is The End last weekend, which was fun, but ended with a version of heaven where, yep you guessed it, the men were dressed in white t-shirts and trousers while the women were in bikinis and/or hot pants.

Is that what the afterlife is really going to be like? Women dressed as sex toys with no other role? I’m pretty sure the Virgin Mary wouldn’t be there letting all her flesh loose.

But I don’t believe this is simply the fault of Page Three, or of men’s ideals of women. I think that we women are not helping ourselves one iota.

It seems we’ve shaken free the shackles of not even showing an ankle and have now shackled ourselves to showing pretty much everything else.

And don’t give me any of that tosh about a woman wearing whatever she wants to feel good about herself.

It’s simply not true. No woman wears next to nothing to feel good unless she’s on a hot beach. Like Miley Cyrus, the underdressed do it to feel powerful, to prove they can get sexual attention.

Imagine swopping a woman’s clothes on to a man’s body, and vice versa. Would a man sit there in a skirt so short he spends the whole time yanking it down his thighs to try and cover a bit more of himself? Or with his cleavage on show through transparent material?

The first step in getting true equality, and not being women who stand around in pants, is to sort out our own wardrobes.

Being a woman isn’t about teaching your daughters that they can wear what they like as we’re equal to men, it’s teaching them that to be equal we should respect ourselves for who we are.