Only giving one neighbour a spare key is not enough

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Jez Clark and Lou Nash

But as if that wasn’t bad enough, I looked down and remembered I had no shoes on!

One time I returned home to discover the front door left open and swaying in the breeze

The next-door neighbour, who I know has a key, was also away.

So I had no choice but to go wandering around the village to some of my mum’s friends to see if any of them had keys to her house.

Unfortunately they didn’t, but one lent me a pair of sandals and another gave me some stepladders.

After trying, and failing, to climb over the back gate to the garden, I luckily bumped into the man who lives two doors down.

He had a key to the neighbour’s house, and in her kitchen we found the key to my mum’s house!

This whole debacle has taught me (and hopefully my mum) that only giving one neighbour a spare key is not enough!

Although perhaps I should just concentrate on holding on to my own set...

Jez: When it comes to getting locked out, I’m lucky to have my brother-in-law around the corner. 

He has a spare key, as does one of our neighbours, so hopefully should the unthinkable happen we will be fine. I remember in our old house we got locked out and ended up calling an emergency locksmith to get us back in.

He succeeded in gaining access in about five minutes.

But it was at this point my wife then discovered that the keys had been inside her fleece pocket all along!

This cock-up ended up costing us more than £100!

Actually, thinking about it, my wife doesn’t have a very good track record when it comes to locking doors.

One time I returned home to discover the front door left open and swaying in the breeze.

Apparently she had a bit of a struggle getting the kids in the car and totally forgot to close the door.

Nothing was taken, so I presume that nothing we own was deemed to be worth stealing!