Portsmouth is proving it can host the major events

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And so the summer is winding down. While the weather may not have made it the most glorious of sun-kissed seasons this year, there have still been triumphs.

The Portsmouth Summer Show and Victorious Festival have been incredibly successful.

The Mutiny Festival, which was held this year at Fontwell, was also a success.

And next year it will be returning to the city, but not to Victoria Park, where it was first staged – it will now be on the much larger site of the King George V Playing Fields.

These events have all proved that major acts can be brought to the region – and that there is an audience hungry for them.

It is also interesting to see that nearly 80 per cent of those who took part in a survey carried out by the council on the seafront, wanted to see more special events held on Southsea Common.

While that survey was the result of just over 1,000 people’s responses, so it should not be read as a mandate from everyone, it does give a strong indication that many are happy to see the common in regular use.

This all bodes well for plans to increase the number of cultural events in and around the city.

We must however, be careful not to whitewash any criticism out of the picture.

Not everyone is a fan of these sorts of events, and yes, Southsea Common has needed some restorative work after the pummelling it took from the rain and then having 100,000 people walking all over it.

The Portsmouth Live concert, as part of the America’s Cup World Series also had its problems – but the organisers have pledged to learn from the experience for next year.

Combined with other schemes going on elsewhere in the city such as the planned revamp of the Guildhall or the soon-to-reopen New Theatre Royal, there is much that is good for us to shout about.