She may be no looker, but her stats are impressive

Harmony of the Seas

Harmony of the Seas

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Many of us have been captivated by the sight of the world’s largest cruise ship, which is in Southampton.

Built in France, Harmony of the Seas’ stats are very impressive.

She’s 1,180ft long, 217ft wide and weighs 227,000 tonnes. That would dwarf our new aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth.

I can’t imagine there will be many places on board Harmony of the Seas that you could escape a screaming child, a queue for a ride or the music wall of sound all over the ship.

Social media has been in meltdown as pictures of her interior have started to appear along with the many attractions she has to offer.

She arrived in Southampton incomplete internally, as is the case these days. An army of fitters have been on board adding the finishing touches to her lounges and bars.

Carpets have been laid, brass fittings added and furniture assembled.

Then she took to the sea for her pre-maiden cruise, taking representatives from the tourism trade out into the English Channel.

Was there anything to do?

Well, three water slides, a 10-storey dry slide, a 1,400-seat theatre, an ice rink, an aqua theatre for diving shows, a zip wire, a bionic robot-operated bar, 20 dining venues and room for 5,500 passengers.

These are just some of the things Harmony of the Seas boasts.

A passenger then posted a picture of her taken from a rather more elegant-looking ship and called it Monstrosity of the Seas.

They have a point. She is no looker compared to the likes of Oriana or Aurora and I must say that two weeks on her would be hell on earth for me.

We love cruising. Relaxing open decks, sophisticated bars and sumptuous restaurants.

But a sea day is about peace and quiet. I can’t imagine there will be many places on board Harmony of the Seas that you could escape a screaming child, a queue for a ride or the music wall of sound all over the ship.

But then again, it shows there is a cruise ship for the needs of everyone.

I bet that in five years’ time, I’ll be on her with my kids, screaming down a water slide, racing up a rock climbing wall or dancing to loud music by a splash pool. What I do hope is that the Oriana will still be around for our retirement!

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