So rare to hear the sound of silence

European workers including nurses, social workers and teaching assistants protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London before lobbying MPs over their right to remain in the UK.  Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

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For most of us, silence is something we can only hope for at night when our heads land on our pillows and we drift off to the land of nod.

But even then there can be many distractions, especially living in a busy city like Portsmouth.

Maybe it could be the neighbours arriving home from work – the slam of a car door is enough to make my eyes ping open.

Or sometimes it can be the windy weather keeping me up.

Not so long ago the silence was broken by the sound of a fox crying on the pavement right outside my house.

But no matter what time of the day, silence never seems to be an option with a constant soundtrack of noise.

Even if you turn the television off there will be a whirring sound from something in the house, maybe the refrigerator or the boiler.

Unless you put your phone on silent there is every chance it will alert you to an incoming call or message. And unless you put a ‘no cold callers’ sign on your front door there is every chance that you will hear a few knocks.

But of course even when there aren’t these kinds of distractions, our minds are still churning with information and thoughts.

It seems that peace and solitude are becoming endangered, but does that really matter?

I recently read an article which boasts about the advantages of taking some time out each day to enjoy some silence.

These include improved blood pressure, less anxiety, a better immune system and lower stress levels.

I don’t know whether this is true or not, but it makes sense.

In our busy lives and schedules, surely a little bit of quiet can only be a good thing?

But most of us, every day, get out of bed, check our phone, put the kettle on, watch the morning’s news, have a shower and go on our way with a day full of noise until our heads hit that pillow once again.

For me there is another thing that stops any silence from occurring. In facts two things – my daughters, who are now aged three and five.

Children love noise, any noise. They enjoy talking, screaming, shouting, screeching and any word that describes the hundreds of sounds that can come out of their mouth.

They also like toys that make a lot of noise, like musical instruments and crying dollies.

But I’ve got so used to the noise they make that it can sometimes feel a little odd when they are out of the house and I often look forward to the noise returning.

I do try to enjoy the odd bit of silence that comes my way. though.Silence can be golden, but when my daughters are home, silence can also be suspicious.