So why are we encouraging girls to look like Barbie?

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There’s a saying that bad things come in threes. Well, for the past week it’s been adverts – ones that purport to do ‘good’.

The first advert in the dock is for Max Factor foundation. Now I don’t have anything against foundation. I understand that it can smooth over pores, hide blemishes and give people a sense of certainty about how they look.

Perhaps if the new Barbie ads tackled that instead of showing adults simpering at the cute girl who wants to be a coach, society might actually get to move forward

I have employed it on more than one occasion, but I never seem to be able to get quite the right mix for my skin.

Hands up all those who had that tide mark around their chin when they were a teenager. Me too.

Ironically, the skin I was trying to cover up was probably the greatest that it ever looked.

But back to the advert. If you see it on the telly, stop what you’re doing, watch it closely and tell me that the woman being used to advertise the foundation doesn’t look unreal.

It’s as if the company has plasticised the model, given her so much Photoshopping or whatever that she appears to be a cyborg-type species from the future.

I only hope we can find a way back from a society that encourages its young women to look like that.

I thought this was a one-off, until I spotted the advert for Maybelline foundation. Look at what’s been done to these poor girls’ faces. They look dreadful. Why are we making people look like Barbie?

Already girls are told to aim for figures and hair like Barbie, clothes like Barbie and a Ken like Barbie. Now it appears they’re being encouraged to have skin like Barbie too. Plastic is fantastic.

Except, while we’re being told to slap on the slap, Barbie is getting her own makeover with a new advert featuring girls daring to dream about their careers (lecturers, coaches and vets).

Which is all well and good, but yet again Barbie is rather behind the times.

You know what? Girls already have those careers. What we want is equal pay, equal status and to be treated the same in the workplace.

Perhaps if the new Barbie ads tackled that instead of showing adults simpering at the cute girl who wants to be a coach, society might actually get to move forward.