Teen Talk for October 1, 2013

Mo Farrah after missing out on a gold medal
				 Picture: Adam Davy

VERITY LUSH: Leave me to browse the make-up counter in peace

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Have your say

These past few weeks, the main political parties have gathered across the UK for their annual conferences.

Preparing for the 2015 general election, the three main parties are doing what they can to win the public eye.

Politics obviously has vast relevance within the society we live in, so why don’t we get more of a say?

We can speak as much as we wish about war, public services, education and youth sectors, but will we really influence decisions?

Anyone under 18 in 2015 is unable to vote. However, they can still be a member of a political party and have some, but little, impact on particular motions.

To me, this doesn’t make sense. It’s all in good for political parties to offer young people the chance to join them in membership from the age of 16, although, when it comes to an overall say, we get nothing.

This may sound slightly biased but it’s true. You don’t see many young people in day-to-day parliamentary life now, do you?

Some argue that young people should be able to vote.

After all, we are the future. We will be the people with the jobs to keep our nation moving.

Hayden Taylor, 17, a student at Havant College and the Managing Director for Question Me UK, a local social enterprise, said: ‘For a long time political education has been missed from the curriculum map.

‘I believe lowering the voting age will help young people to wake up to the importance of their voice and opinion.

‘My opinion is that if you can enrol with the forces, start a family and pay tax, you should have a say in the voting system.’

On the other hand, people may believe that at the ages of 16 and 17, young people are too young and inexperienced to vote.

Emma Foster, 17, a student at South Downs College said: ‘I don’t think young people should be able to vote on who’s in government.

‘I believe that youngsters wouldn’t have the right mindset to decide who can be in charge. Besides, teenagers have enough pressures with education let alone worrying about who’s ruling.’

What is your opinion? Should young people under the age of 18 be able to vote in the 2015 general election? You can tweet me, I’d love to hear what you all feel.