The little pink pig that won’t go away

Sian Crips, Georgia Perry and Abi Robinson, from Oaklands School, Waterlooville, celebrating their A-level results. Picture: Habibur Rahman PPP-170817-140116006

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Fads, crazes and fashions tend to come and go – you know, when something is followed or used enthusiastically by a large number of people for a limited space of time.

Most recently in playgrounds across the country were loom bands and everyone from the Duchess of Cambridge to Harry Styles from chart-topping band One Direction were seen wearing these bracelets made from colourful rubber bands.

My daughter Caitlin was one of the many across the world who caught on to the loom band craze and I was forever finding tiny elastic bands on the floor around the house.

Now that craze seems to be passing, but inevitably soon there will be something new that will come along and then disappear as quickly as it arrived.

We grown-ups are also guilty of latching on to the latest fad and craze.

Think back a few years when celebrity chefs Delia Smith and Jamie Oliver cooked their roast potatoes in goose fat.

This caused sales to rocket in supermarkets and goose fat sold out across the country.

Go back further to the 1990s and maybe you were involved in that dance craze the Macarena which was sung and danced to at weddings and birthday parties during 1996.

Some crazes do make a comeback.

For example, as I child I loved the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

I watched the TV shows and had all the action figures. But they soon dropped out of fashion and I moved onto the next thing.

Now I’ve heard from my seven-year-old nephew that they are back in fashion and more popular than ever.

But there is one thing that doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon.

This is the pre-school animated animal known as Peppa Pig. It was created 10 years ago and is still going strong.

Last week it was revealed that this year alone the brand will make more than £600m in global TV and merchandising revenues.

The continued success and popularity is great for us, it meant that all the Peppa Pigs toys and merchandise my daughter received over the first few years of her life at Christmas and on birthdays could be passed on to her younger sister Alyssa.

Caitlin who has reached the wise old age of five, now says Peppa Pig ‘is for babies’, but I still catch her engrossed in the show if her little sister is watching and I know she wouldn’t say no if a trip to Peppa Pig World at Paultons Park was offered.

With my daughters being just three and five, I realise I’ve got many more fads, fashions and crazes to come.

They will all make my wallet lighter.

But for now we’ll continue to recycle the little pink pig.