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We all tell our children little white lies sometimes and anyone who says they don’t is probably stretching the truth a bit.

I remember my mum telling me if I kept playing with my ears they would grow bigger and bigger, or if the wind changed when I was pulling funny faces I would stay looking like that forever.

It seems that I have inherited the art of fibbing as I have to admit that the odd whopper has come out of my mouth too when I’ve been talking to my children.

I’ve said things like: ‘The shop has run out of chocolate’, when Caitlin has had a sudden craving for the brown stuff.

And: ‘That’s a brilliant picture of a dinosaur’, when what she has actually drawn on the paper is just a squiggly colourful mess.

Of course, a white lie is usually used for the greater good and is harmless in the long term.

But according to an article I read recently, there is an even bigger lie that we all tell our children – and that lie is when we tell our little ones that we don’t have a favourite child.

According to a study, all parents with more than one child have a preference for one of them and enjoy their company more than the other.

I have to admit that when my partner Serena was pregnant with our second girl, Alyssa, I wondered how it would be possible to love this new child as much as her big sister Caitlin, who I’d fallen in love with the second she was born.

I worried that although Alyssa would be special to me, she would never be quite as special as our first born.

Of course as soon as Alyssa arrived into the world I instantly had that same overwhelming loving feeling that I had experienced with her big sister.

I can honestly say that I do not have a favourite child, or feel more love for one of them than the other.

But I do sometimes worry that Alyssa might have to live in Caitlin’s shadow.

Most of her clothes are hand me downs, she can’t do some activities that her sister can do as she’s not yet capable and she might miss out on privileges, such as staying up later.

But of course there are advantages to being the second born.

She will always be the baby of the family and can learn from her big sister’s mistakes.

Also if any problems should arise when she’s at school she’ll always have Caitlin there to look after her.

And of course, when Alyssa starts to get interested in stuff like fashion, music and make-up, instead of popping to the shops like everyone else, I’m sure she’ll instead be popping into her big sister’s bedroom to do some ‘borrowing’.