Those infected with hepatitis deserve to see justice done

Mo Farrah after missing out on a gold medal
				 Picture: Adam Davy

VERITY LUSH: Leave me to browse the make-up counter in peace

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Being infected with a deadly virus is a terrible thing for anyone – but it is doubly so for Sally Vickers, who is featured on our front page today.

She received a transfusion more than 30 years ago after she was born with a condition that causes her to have odd-shaped blood cells

It took years for the fact she contracted the virus to come to light.

But it then emerged the condition she was born with means she cannot have treatment for the hepatitis.

Now the virus is slowly attacking her liver, and she wants an apology and justice for not just herself, but for everybody affected.

As Mrs Vickers says: ‘I want the government to apologise – how could this have happened in such a way?

‘We want to make the public aware of what happened and what we’re having to live with.’

We are sure Mrs Vickers is not the only one who feels this way.

But we are also pleased to hear the Department of Health say it is looking into possible improvements to the support it provides for those affected.

However those diagnosed with hepatitis C are rightly sceptical and concerned that the issue has been passed on from government to government – with nobody wanting to be tarred with the mistake.

So we call upon the government to put concerns over its own image aside and do what is right for those affected by this dreadful scandal.

Mrs Vickers is not the only one to have suffered as a result of the contaminated blood.

There are thousands of others like her, including several from our own area, who for various reasons required transfusions and have had to live with this virus ever since.

Many of them were left undiagnosed for years, until the full scale of the contamination became obvious.

These people deserve their answers, and an apology for the ill health they have suffered as a result.

To read the full story click here.