Tough cookie is so inspirational

Katie Piper
Katie Piper
Karel Doubleday, who used her mum's blue badge so she could park close to her workplace

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Sometimes folks, when you’re feeling down in the dumps because of no spondulicks, ill health, relationship issues, or all of the above, you start thinking ‘Why me? Everything’s going boobs up – again.’

Well, after a brief blub the old bodacious Brit Babe indomitable spirit returns and I shout back at The Universe: ‘Hey, when your back’s against the wall, don’t quit’, or ‘In every adversity lies a bigger or better benefit.’

How true is that, folks? Think of all the times when you didn’t get the perfect job, the darling of your dreams or an invite to a special occasion. And you want to give up.

Well don’t. Keep positive.

Because many a time, through a mysterious chain of events, you get a better job or a luscious lovebug and you throw your own fabulous party.

My favourite ‘shout out’ is ‘when the going gets tough, the tough get going’.

Katie Piper is one tough cookie who, when life dealt her one hell of a challenging hand, fought back.

You may have read about Katie – three years ago acid was thrown in her face in an horrific attack.

She’s endured numerous facial reconstructive operations since, but Katie’s selfless spirit shines through.

The TV series Katie: My Beautiful Friends is following her setting up a charity to raise money for a burns and rehabilitation centre to help others.

It’s a very graphic programme, showing other courageous facially and bodily disfigured people and their lives and operations.

It really humbles you folks, and those challenges I mentioned earlier pale into insignificance when you watch these brave people struggle, not only with all the painful surgery but people’s attitudes to their disfigurement.

What a spiteful society we can be. Gawping at people who are different, sniggering, laughing , and pointing and making cruel comments about others.

I was always taught to measure the size of my critic – and I find they are usually very small.