We must all learn a lesson from this drugs death

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The scourge of drugs is not a new problem.

And over the past few decades it’s made its way to the top of the government agenda.

On a worldwide scale, there’s the war on drugs targeting the supply chain.

While nationally, police have spent decades cracking down on drugs that bring so much misery to people’s lives.

While it’s debatable as to how successful those campaigns have been, what’s in no doubt is that the reasons for the fight are laudable.

But with leaps forward in technology, so there have been huge changes in the drugs world.

Whereas everyone’s heard of heroin and crack cocaine and is aware of the risks should they choose to take it, the new problem comes from synthetic drugs, many not yet criminalised and known as ‘legal highs’.

And as quick as these highs are made illegal, those behind them tweak the formula to get around the law.

But nothing hammers home the message as to the dangers these drugs can pose than our story on page 6 today.

Martin Gatenby died at the age of just 25 after taking a so-called legal high.

But, as the coroner pointed out, he was not a junkie who spent his time scrabbling around for a fix, but a Cambridge-educated high-flier who worked at QA Hospital.

It any good can ever come of a death, it can only be that people learn from mistakes others have made.

And tragically, Martin’s case is a prime example.

There will be hundreds of people across this area, young old and everything in between who will take drugs of one kind or another this weekend.

While we wish no-one should suffer the fate Martin did, we hope that this cautionary tale will make just a few of them think again.