We need your help to fight with us in our new campaign

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Today we are launching our new campaign, calling for the judicial system to get tough on those who kill through dangerous driving.

We want a change in the law for everyone, which currently allows a maximum jail sentence of 14 years for those found guilty of causing death by dangerous driving.

We don’t believe that the law, as it stands, provides a suitable punishment for those who kill others in these circumstances.

A car can be a lethal weapon, as has been proven time and time again.

And this was the devastating outcome in the cases involving the deaths of Payton Sparks, Jasmine Allsop and Olivia Lewry.

Lewis Young was jailed for eight years for killing Payton, while Samuel Etherington was jailed for nine years for killing Jasmine and Olivia.

The figures relating to the charge of death by dangerous driving make for uncomfortable reading – the number of cases rose by 38 per cent, from 164 in 2011 to 2012, to 226 in 2012 to 2013.

And out of those, a mere nine per cent of the drivers convicted are handed down a sentence of more than five years.

Obviously we cannot speak to the circumstances of many of those cases. But it is hard to believe that a sentence of less than five years reflects what many would consider fair.

In these two though, we do not consider that the sentences reflect the seriousness and impact.

We have proved that we are tenacious as a paper and we will not back down. Just look at our campaign for the Arctic Convoy veterans – for more than a decade we fought to bring them a dedicated medal, and we were ultimately successful.

We will fight just as hard to see this campaign succeed.

But we need you, our readers to help us. We know how strong your feelings are on this subject because you’ve been telling us already.

However, we need you to write to us, whether on Facebook, via email, or by putting pen to paper, and tell us what you think of the current situation, and why it should change.