We’ve got more in common than Salmond will admit

Children adore being spoilt by their grandparents, but is it too much?

VERITY LUSH: Don’t blame gran for kids munching on e-numbers

0
Have your say

Awhile back I wrote in this column that I hoped Scotland would stay with us. But now, contrary to what seems to be popular opinion here, I’m not so sure.

After all, isn’t the old adage that if you love someone, let them go?

I do love Scotland, but not as passionately as some Scots seem to loathe us.

Alex Salmond strikes me as a particularly vitriolic man. I bristle whenever I hear him, waiting for a comment which paints me as evil because I was born in Portsmouth, but my children angelic as they are Fifers.

Yes, I admit ancient history isn’t a festering sore on my conscience, so perhaps I’m not in a position to comment about his passion.

But the barrage of words against Westminster does make me laugh, as if the Scots are the only ones who feel hard done by.

The English masses have far more in common with the Scots than Salmond can ever admit. Do we trust out politicians? Er. No. Do we enjoy the way we’re governed? No.

Do we believe there is an equitable society? No.

If Scotland does split up the union, I might be campaigning for a referendum for us to be governed by Edinburgh.

With free prescriptions and free university places, who wouldn’t want a shift change in policy to look after the masses rather than the elite?

But I wouldn’t want Salmond at the helm, not when basic questions are left blowing in the wind prior to the vote tomorrow – currency being a key one (a radio show suggested if Scotland leaves us we should put Maggie Thatcher on our bank notes).

If Scotland goes, it will be tough for them. It will be tough for us. But we’ll all get through it and Scotland may well be a happier place for it (if Salmond doesn’t feel hard-done by in any devolution deal).

I like the idea of Scotland being happy, shifting its national psyche towards positivity.

I just hope that if they have the courage to do it, we also can find the courage to change our political system so that 16-year-olds with ideals can come out and vote and we can put people and their environment – instead of big business – first.