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Are we getting value for money from the BBC? I think not. As the cost of living continues to spiral, is it right for the corporation to spend millions on moving headquarters from London to Salford?

Radio 5 Live was the first to move and is already suffering with a lack of live guests who are unable or unwilling to make the journey from the capital to the north.

Many presenters have left too, with the popular Sian Williams quitting BBC Breakfast when it makes the move as she doesn’t want to uproot her family.

I believe there’s a place for a public service broadcaster, but I don’t think the current BBC fits that bill.

It’s far too fat and many of its main stations really should be in the commercial sector. We should only pay for the services that would not be commercially viable.

Where the BBC is worth its weight in gold are stations like Radio 4 and 5. Speech and sport is something the commercial sector has always struggled to match the BBC on.

The amount of manpower needed to create the content involved simply does not add up economically.

Is it right that public money is spent paying Chris Evans £1.1m a year? No wonder he talks about his collection of Ferraris all the time.

Graham Norton is raking in a whacking £2.2m a year for one show a week and the team on Match of the Day apparently earn £3m a year between them.

Remember the fuss about paying the CEO of RBS a £1m bonus? Well compare that to how much the top stars on the corporation’s books are earning. Where’s the outrage?

I don’t have a problem with stars earning such amounts if it’s privately funded. But we’re paying for it.

Would BBC1 and Radios 1 and 2 really suffer if they were sold off to the commercial sector? They play enough adverts about their own products already, so I doubt we’d notice much difference.

That would leave the corporation to focus all its resources on making great specialist TV programmes and speech radio. It’s time to sell off Auntie’s silverware to bring down the running costs of her house.