ZELLA COMPTON: Visiting No. 6 Cinema was an enjoyable adventure

Breastfeeding
Breastfeeding
The handsome fang-tooth snake eel

ELISE BREWERTON: When the tide begins to turn

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I ventured over the water from Gosport last weekend to finally visit No. 6 Cinema in the dockyard.

It’s been on my radar for a few years, but for some reason I’ve never quite managed to get there.

What a mistake – it’s glorious. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not glorious in a beautiful, ornate way or anything like that. It’s more the adventure of getting there.

Going through into the dockyard via gruff gatekeepers. Following a cobbled path, climbing iron stairs that twist over a small internal bridge.

This all appealed to my sense of mischief, especially as we’d set off to see Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, the film adaptation of Newt Scamander’s epic textbook much studied at Harry Potter’s Hogwarts School and developed for screen by J K Rowling.

The entrance quest seemed fitting, with its changes of pace, of scenery, the unexpected and also with the sense of belonging to a secret group which you certainly don’t get when you queue up for popcorn at a multiplex, jostling elbows with others carrying cardboard dishes of hot dogs and nachos.

Once inside, No. 6 Cinema didn’t let me down with its mix of volunteers, arty-type customers and beers.

The latter turned out to be fine too. It was a lucky selection as I’d not known what to buy for my husband when I made it to the bar (we hadn’t realised that alcohol was available).

Another man in the queue recommended the beer I ended up with, the sage advice being ‘if he doesn’t like this, he’s got no taste.’

That’s a tricky statement if ever I heard one, especially when making it to a wife. Obviously my husband has fine taste – why would you doubt that openly to my face? I am sure he meant it with genuine best intentions, she says, sucking in her stomach.

The only downside of this large, yet curiously intimate screening space was the temperature. We could have made cup-cakes in that sauna heat.

It reminded me a bit of my lecture theatre days. No wonder my students’ eyes drooped. And the film? That was okay and looked fabulous on the big screen. I’m sure the potential new Potter generation will be hooked.

WHY WOULD ANYBODY COMPLAIN ABOUT THIS NATURAL PROCESS?

How terrific to read that the Pope encourages women to breastfeed in public, advocating it in the Sistine Chapel to be precise.

If I was compiling a list of those who support public breastfeeding, I wouldn’t have necessarily put down the head of the Catholic church.

His words, I hope, will add considerably to the others who stand up against the ridiculous notion that women shouldn’t feed in public.

When billboards feature semi-nude ladies, buttocks and breasts displayed to sell goods, it seems incredulous that anyone would complain about one of the most natural processes in the world.

Yet still they do, regularly, calling it disgusting and restricting it to bathrooms or hidden corners.

Some people believe breasts are for branding, not babies.

KNOW BUDDING PERFORMERS? THEN TELL THEM TO GET ALONG

If you know any budding student performers in Year 10 and above, there are open auditions taking place this Saturday (Jan 14) for a brand new musical.

The show, Ambition, promises to be a thrilling piece of musical theatre and is being performed along the south coast in May. And yes, I am plugging this as I wrote it – so it will be a delicious spectacular of course.

It’s written for student performance (for pupils who live or study in Hampshire) and those interested can find out more information by searching Facebook for @musicaltheatreprojectHMS or e-mailing Ambition@hms.hants.gov.uk, or arriving at the New Theatre Royal, Portsmouth stage door on Saturday (noon for male/ female leads, 1pm for chorus members).