Adventurer Alan after yet another world record

Alan Priddy
Alan Priddy
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VETERAN adventurer Alan Priddy already has 37 world records to his name – and now he wants one more.

The 57-year-old, who runs Portsmouth-based sailing charity Around and Around, wants to seize the world record for the fastest powerboat circumnavigation of the world.

The record is currently held by New Zealander Peter Bethune after his voyage in 2008.

He completed the 24,000-mile journey in 60 days, 23 hours and 49 minutes.

But Mr Priddy is confident he and his team can do it in 50 days with their custom-designed and built powerboat.

At 80ft long and 16ft wide, the vessel has an estimated top speed of more than 45 knots (50mph).

Mr Priddy, who already holds the record for the fastest powerboat crossing of the Atlantic, said he wanted to smash the existing world record with a time ‘that will be nearly impossible to beat’.

The attempt comes almost 10 years after his last bid at breaking the record.

On that occasion it had to be abandoned after one of his crew suffered a heart attack just two days before the finish.

‘It was the record that missed me,’ Mr Priddy said.

‘We tried so hard for it in 2002 but one of our crew had a heart attack two days before the finish. We have left nothing to chance on this one.

‘We have tried to cover every eventuality so we’re prepared before it happens.

‘It’s unfinished business; the bit that I have missed in my life. It’s something I have wanted to do since 1997 and it has just got to be done.

‘I have been messing about in boats for a very long time.’

Three other seasoned racers will join Mr Priddy on his attempt in November this year, including British champion Shelley Jory-Leigh.

Strict rules govern the route Alan Priddy and his crew must take. The craft has to pass through the Suez and Panama canals.

The team’s proposed route is formed of five 4,800-mile legs, starting and ending in Gibraltar.