All welcome at mass in celebration of extraordinary family

STUNNING Father Sean Tobin and Julie Scarborough with the new window at St Colman's Church in Cosham.   Picture: Malcom Wells (112956-2970)
STUNNING Father Sean Tobin and Julie Scarborough with the new window at St Colman's Church in Cosham. Picture: Malcom Wells (112956-2970)
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THE legacy of a family who educated thousands of people and steered Portsmouth through the Blitz has been recognised.

The Daley family, made up of Dennis, Kathleen, Hilda, Frank and Tom, set up the small Daley School in 1917 to educate local girls.

BLITZ Winston Churchill with Portsmouth Lord Mayor Dennis Daley look at the bomb-damaged city in January 1941

BLITZ Winston Churchill with Portsmouth Lord Mayor Dennis Daley look at the bomb-damaged city in January 1941

Over half a century it grew to accommodate hundreds of pupils, eventually merging with The Convent of the Cross in Stakes Hill Road, Waterlooville, and becoming Oaklands Catholic School.

Dennis Daley, who was later knighted, was a Royal Marine and Lord Mayor of Portsmouth during the Second World War.

He became friends with Sir Winston Churchill and King George and Queen Elizabeth who made several visits to the bombed-out city.

Julie Scarborough, 76, attended the Daley School and went on to teach there. She has raised the money to install a stained glass window at St Colman’s Church, Havant Road, Cosham, as a memorial to the family, who worshipped there.

A mass will be held at the church to remember the family.

Mrs Scarborough, from Widley, said: ‘I think their legacy would be the same as the Daley School motto, which is, live in such a way that you may live hereafter.

‘They treated others as they would like to be treated. They were a very kind family and worked very hard.

‘I was absolutely terrified during the bombing and became an elective mute until I was 11 so I found it a very comforting place to be.

‘It was a very caring atmosphere but the discipline was good there. There was a lovely ambience.

‘What I liked about it in particular was, although it was a Catholic school, there were Jewish, Baptist and Church of England girls there. In fact there were very few Catholics because the Catholic families in Portsmouth at that time were quite penniless so they gave out scholarships to enable them to join the school.’

The mass, on August 31 at 11am, is open to all those who would like to celebrate the Daley family.

For more details contact Mrs Scarborough on (023) 9238 9689.