Bafta star Daisy Jacobs goes back to school

Former pupil Daisy Jacobs (centre) returns to Bay House School to talk to students about her life as an artist and award winning animator.  (left to right), year eleven students, Eleanor Webb, Yvette Parry, Chloe Barr, and Molly Huntington. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (150403-4

Former pupil Daisy Jacobs (centre) returns to Bay House School to talk to students about her life as an artist and award winning animator. (left to right), year eleven students, Eleanor Webb, Yvette Parry, Chloe Barr, and Molly Huntington. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (150403-4

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  • Students watch her short animation The Bigger Picture as part of the talk
  • Bay House School headteacher Ian Potter says she is a ‘fantastic role model’
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AWARD-winning animator Daisy Jacobs paid a visit to her former school to talk to art students about her international success.

Daisy, from Gosport, has just won a Bafta and was nominated for an Oscar for her short animation The Bigger Picture.

Following her Bafta win, Bay House School headteacher Ian Potter invited Daisy to speak to A-level art students.

The 26-year-old said: ‘Being back at Bay House made me feel like I was doing my art A-level again especially giving the talk in the art department.

‘I really liked talking to the students and being able to show them what is possible.

‘I know whenever someone came in and spoke about what they had achieved and how they achieved it, I would always find that very inspiring.

It is important for students to know they can achieve big things if they work hard.

Animator Daisy Jacobs

‘It is important for students to know they can achieve big things if they work hard.’

As part of the talk, students were shown The Bigger Picture which tells the darkly humorous tale of two brothers caring for their elderly mother.

Daisy, who studied at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London, used a mixture of life-size paintings and papier-mâché for the eight-minute animation.

It took her a year to make from a technique she learned at the National Film and Television School.

She explained to the students how she produced it and what it takes to be a good director.

‘You have to be quite assertive,’ she said.

‘You need to be able to listen to other people’s ideas and then decide if they fit in with your idea.

‘I enjoyed being a director and an animator but some people like to do one or the other.’

Work has already started on Daisy’s next film which also looks at the family issue of drifting apart. It is set in the 1970s and 1980s.

She said: ‘I started working on it about five months ago doing the script and the storyline.

‘Production for it will start in June and I am really looking forward to it.’

Daisy is now looking to the future after a busy few weeks flying out to Los Angeles for the Oscars where she lost in the Best Short Animation category to Disney’s film Feast.

‘It was amazing to win the Bafta and there is no shame in losing to Disney,’ she said.

‘It was nice to be nominated for an Oscar and that was a big honour.

‘It still hasn’t sunk in that I am a Bafta winner.’

Mr Potter said it was great for the students to hear from Daisy about her successes.

He said: ‘Daisy is a fantastic role model for the students especially after winning the Bafta and then before that the Women in Art Award.

‘It tells not only our students but Gosport people that anyone can achieve worldwide fame.

‘She spoke a lot about hard work and it is good for the students to realise that that is required to achieve something big.’

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