Charity scarf gala to raise money for African causes

BIG IDEA Some of the scarves, and  Juliet Mansell, below
BIG IDEA Some of the scarves, and Juliet Mansell, below
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CHARITY fundraiser Juliet Mansell, from Portchester, is holding a gala event to raise funds for the Obakki Foundation.

The event called ‘Be Creative With Your Scarf’, fits in with Obakki Foundation’s Scarves for Water campaign, where the charity builds one water well in Africa with the profits of every 500 Obakki scarves they sell.

The gala takes place on Wednesday, June 24, from 7pm until 9pm at the Red Lion Hotel, East Street, Fareham. Tickets are £5.

The evening will feature someone teaching the different ways to wear a scarf, a make-up artist, and fashion tips on how to mix and match colours.

More than 100 people are expected to attend.

Juliet will be giving five Obakki scarves away during a raffle and hopes to raise more than £1,000 from the event.

Juliet said: ‘It will be a really girlie evening. It will be great and everyone should come along.’

Obakki helps provide clean drinking water in South Sudan, and also provides education and health care services in Cameroon.

Juliet has been following the Obakki Foundation since 2010 after she read their blog describing their volunteering work in Cameroon.

She said: ‘It is a charity that really struck home with me, and since I learned of the charity, instead of buying a bottle of water everyday I put that pound in the charity tin for them.’

Juliet is one of 20 taking part in the Live With a Purpose competition set up by the Obakki Foundation. It involves people from all over the world running their own fundraising events.

The person who raises the most money will win a trip to Cameroon accompanying Obakka founder Treana Peake.

Juliet has also vowed to raise money for 50 different charities in the next decade to celebrate turning 50 this year. She will do this by running events, doing challenges and selling hand-made gifts.

She said: ‘I wanted to do something significant to mark the occasion, something that shows the world I was here.’