Community gets behind teenage sensation Isaac ahead of BGT final

Isaac Waddington, Britain's Got Talent finalist, with his siblings Jack and Martha
Isaac Waddington, Britain's Got Talent finalist, with his siblings Jack and Martha
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HE’S won over the nation with his incredible voice.

And now The News and the community are getting behind Isaac Waddington to get over the final hurdle and win Britain’s Got Talent tomorrow.

The 15-year-old sensation has wowed the judges and public with his performances, including a fabulous piano-accompanied version of Bonnie Raitt’s I Can’t Make You Love Me in the semi-final.

Among his biggest cheerleaders in the final will be his 94-year-old great-grandmother Brenda Lepora, who will be watching from Whiteoaks Resthome in Fareham.

She told family that her ‘darling’ had ‘made us proud’ and laughed that all the rest home residents were on ‘the edge of their seats’ as they watched the semi-final.

Isaac’s dad Scott Waddington, 46, said: ‘She said if he wins, she wants a big white Bentley car.’

Britain's Got Talent finalist Isaac Waddington and his 94-year-old great-grandmother Brenda Lepora

Britain's Got Talent finalist Isaac Waddington and his 94-year-old great-grandmother Brenda Lepora

Isaac, who attends Portsmouth Grammar School and lives in Portchester, started singing at a young age and his talent was discovered at his dad’s boatyard at WicorMarine Yacht Haven.

A customer heard him singing under his boat and told his father.

After successfully auditioning for Prebendal choir school in Chichester, Isaac has never looked back.

He was head chorister for services at Chichester Cathedral and was named BBC Radio 2’s young chorister of the year in 2012.

His talent has been honed through years of practice – sometimes up to 30 hours a week.

Isaac and his dad, mum Imogen, sister Martha, nine, and brother Jack, 12, are now all in London preparing for the big day.

Isaac admitted he was ‘knackered’ but excited about the opportunity before him.

‘I’m going to go to the hotel and get a few hours sleep and listen to music,’ he told The News.

‘There’s a lot of vocal warming up. I’m going to have to keep learning the song and not forget how it goes.

‘It’s really about keeping in the zone.’

Isaac said the elation of being in the final was hard to put into words.

He said: ‘I have watched it since I was six years old.

‘Now I’m actually in it myself which is weird. I’m loving it.

‘It’s just an amazing experience.’

Scott, who was a chorister at St John’s College in Southsea, said he was a very proud parent as he watched his son in the semi-final.

He said: ‘He delivered a mature, pure and uncluttered performance with no gimmicks.

‘It was just him and his piano and his voice.

‘He silenced his audience and it made for a very memorable moment for the whole family.

‘I know much it meant to him to get into the final.

‘It’s been a difficult process as he’s been working hard on his GCSEs.

‘He’s managed to juggle everything and keep his feet on the ground.’

Isaac said his head is ‘spinning’ just before he goes on the Britain’s Got Talent stage.

But he said: ‘When I start singing, everything, apart from how I sing, goes out of my head.

‘As soon as I finish, my heart stops for a second, then boom, it’s back to reality.’

The family wanted to thank everybody for their support.