Dixie-May’s luscious locks are cut to help others

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A SIX-YEAR-OLD girl was so moved by children suffering from cancer that she decided to cut off her impressive 3ft-long hair.

Dixie-May Heiford wanted to do something for the Little Princess Trust after seeing someone donate their hair to the charity on television, even though she has never had her hair cut before.

Six-year-old Dixie-May Heiford, is donating her very long hair to the little princess trust, she has never had her hair cut, her hair is 36 inch long (3 foot) and she is 46 inch tall. They have arranged to have it cut at Headmasters in Fareham.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (132336-349)

Six-year-old Dixie-May Heiford, is donating her very long hair to the little princess trust, she has never had her hair cut, her hair is 36 inch long (3 foot) and she is 46 inch tall. They have arranged to have it cut at Headmasters in Fareham.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (132336-349)

Her mother Mary Heiford, 40, said: ‘She’s just under 4ft and her hair is 3ft so she’s going to have it cut to the shoulders at Headmasters.’

Dixie-May, of Wallington Court, Fareham, saw someone donating their hair to the Little Princess Trust and knew then she wanted to do the same.

Mary said: ‘She saw on television a little girl having her hair cut for charity.

‘And since then that is 
what she said she is going to do, grow it then have it cut for charity.’

The charity makes wigs out of donated hair and gives them to both girls and boys who are undergoing chemotherapy to treat cancer, a process which causes hair loss.

Dixie-May has let her hair grow as long as possible to make more wigs.

Her father Mark Heiford, 45, said: ‘She wants it done, she’s not being forced in any way, it’s her choice.

‘As long as it’s not too short.’

Although proud of his daughter, Mark was not keen on her losing her long hair. He said: ‘It’s her personal choice, it’s all been up to her.’

Mary is looking forward to not having to plait Dixie-May’s hair every morning before school.

She said: ‘I don’t mind. I don’t have to have the screaming match in the morning.

‘I’m pleased I’m not going to be doing that any more.’

Dixie-May is going into Year 2 at Redlands Lane primary school and wanted to start the year as a different girl with her hair cut and her ears pierced.

She said she was not nervous about getting her hair cut for the first time, but excited to be helping other people.