Film-makers get creative to win award at ceremony

Two of the new one pounds coins including one given as change to a charity worker which he believes may be fake (left).

WATCH: Is this the first forged version of the new £1 coin?

0
Have your say

A GROUP of youngsters can now claim to be award-winning film-makers after scooping a prize at a ceremony.

The group of Brune Park pupils won an award for creativity at the uScreen event at Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire.

.' (from left to right) 'Sarah Dance, executive director of special projects at Screen South; Imogen Cottle, 13, a year 9 pupil at Brune Park School, actress and subject of the film; Sam Williams, 25, director of the film; and Mik Scarlet, awards presenter and writer/actor/musician. All at Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire.

.' (from left to right) 'Sarah Dance, executive director of special projects at Screen South; Imogen Cottle, 13, a year 9 pupil at Brune Park School, actress and subject of the film; Sam Williams, 25, director of the film; and Mik Scarlet, awards presenter and writer/actor/musician. All at Pinewood Studios, Buckinghamshire.

Short-listed with five groups from across the region, they anxiously took their seats in front of a cinema screen to view all the entries before the results were announced.

It was the first time that the group, led by director Sam Williams, 25, of Kennedy Crescent, Alverstoke, had the opportunity to see their film, along with the competition, on the big screen.

All the films shown at the uScreen event depicted the lives of young people who were either disabled or deaf.

And as previously reported in The News, the Gosport-based group were shortlsited after impressing judges with their film, No Limits. about Imogen Cottle, 13, a deaf year 9 Brune Park School pupil.

The film portrays Imogen’s life as a deaf teenager, following her day-to-day activities, showing that that she can swim and dance, just like every other teenager.

Imogen, who is revealed to be deaf only at the end of the film when she puts her hearing aid on, said: ‘It was a big shock that I won something, I was happy.

‘I was hoping to win something but when they called out Brune Park I was shocked and thought “what’s going on”?’

‘It was fantastic, there were lots of people there; I made some friends and really enjoyed it.

And Imogen enjoyed the limelight, along with the opportunity to learn more about other disabilities.

She said: ‘There were only two other deaf people there.

‘The other films were fantastic, I learned about other disabilities. Some films were funny and some were serious.’

And Sam was proud of her team’s work, after they spent months putting it together.

She said: ‘Our film was really creative, we used curved angles and heightened the contrast.

‘It was more an art piece than a documentary.’

The uScreen awards, run by Screen South, aimed to give young disabled and deaf people, aged between 14 and 25 years old the chance to make films together.

The group puts disabled and non-disabled young people together to help them learn from each other.

Back to the top of the page