Gosport sea cadet helps woman who collapsed in a KFC

Gosport Sea Cadet Lucy Harding  with, from left, Jack Prior, Harry Salmon, Benjamin Barry, Matthew Pipe and Rachel Sherman 'Picture: Paul Jacobs (151891-1)

Gosport Sea Cadet Lucy Harding with, from left, Jack Prior, Harry Salmon, Benjamin Barry, Matthew Pipe and Rachel Sherman 'Picture: Paul Jacobs (151891-1)

The University of Portsmouth has confirmed that current student and for mer sabbatical officer Roxy Negru (middle) has passed away. PPP-170325-110019001

Tributes paid after death of University of Portsmouth student

  • Lucy Harding took control of a situation after a woman collapsed in KFC
  • The 16-year-old sea cadet had to put her first aid knowledge to the test
  • She was able to remain calm until paramedics turned up
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TEENAGER Lucy Harding sprang into action when she saw a woman who had collapsed in a fast-food restaurant.

The 16-year-old learnt first-aid through being a Sea Cadet but had to swap fake scenarios for real life when a woman needed to be treated in the KFC in Gosport.

Adrenaline just kicks in in those situations and you have to remain calm.

Lucy Harding

Lucy was visiting with her friend when a girl said someone had collapsed in the toilet.

Rather than panic like other people there, Lucy remained calm and stepped in to help.

She said: ‘Lots of people had crowded around the woman who was on the floor.

‘I told them that unless they could help, they should get out the way.

‘It was a small space and I had to get close to her to check she was breathing.’

The woman was conscious but had vomited before collapsing and Lucy was worried she might choke if she was sick again.

‘She was partly in the recovery position from the way she fell,’ she said.

‘But I had to lift her head and make sure she wouldn’t choke if she was ill again.

‘Her hands felt really cold but her face was bright red.’

Lucy, from Gosport, stayed calm throughout the situation and talked to the woman to reassure her.

She added: ‘Because she was hot, I had to remove her jacket but I was telling her what I was doing to keep her calm.

‘We learn to do it that way to reassure them.’

When the paramedics arrived, Lucy handed over to them and the woman’s partner thanked her for her help.

‘It was nice to know that what I had done was appreciated,’ she said.

The day before the incident, Lucy, who has been a sea cadet for four years, had been teaching first-aid to the younger cadets. They found it hard to take seriously but she warned they should listen carefully as they would never know when someone might need help.

She said: ‘This is the second time I have had to treat a member of the public. About two years ago, someone fell and cut their head and I had to help then too.

‘Adrenaline just kicks in in those situations and you have to remain calm. It is really important to know first-aid and I always tell the younger sea cadets they might be needed to help one day.

‘They never think it is going to happen to them but it could.’

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